GRADE 2 RESOURCES

The Intentional & Direct Teaching of Essential Citizenship Competencies

GRADE 2 CITIZENSHIP STUDIES ENGAGED CITIZENS

Part A: Curricular Connections and Background

BROAD AREA OF CITIZENSHIP

Engaged Citizens question, critically examine, advocate, and defend rights and responsibilities of a democracy on multiple levels. They work to understand the issues, overt and hidden within citizenship challenges and develop appropriate action plans to address those issues.
Rules, regulations, and laws are the primary means by which society organizes and brings structure to itself. Students will consider the relationship between rights and responsibilities in setting and following rules. They will examine the effects of rules and begin to appreciate the responsibilities of the governing body that developed those rules/structures. Finally students will become conscious of the responsibility that citizens have to support and contribute to varying levels of governance.

OVERVIEW AND DESIRED RESULTS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Students will work to understand the different impacts of rules on people and will strive to understand the underlying purpose behind the rule.
Students will examine the various levels of government to understand the responsibilities of different governments and understand the decision making process. They will also examine the processes for raising questions and implementing change with a variety of governmental structures.
As engaged citizens strive to understand issues from a variety of viewpoints, they will also begin to explore different ways to solve problems and examine and practice actions that contribute to peace and order. Students will be encouraged to try to understand a point of view that is different from their own.

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Grade 2 students will continue to understand the decision-making process and explore the rights and responsibilities associated with belonging to society.
Students will continue to learn about actions and practices that contribute to peace and order in society and the governance structures that create those rules. Rules will be examined to determine their purposes and the implications of the decision. In addition, students will analyze how decisions are made and consider the scope of consequences of decisions. As students learn how rules are made, they will also learn the processes for changing rules. Students will appreciate that people can have different points of view on the same topic.
  • Enduring understandings are the big ideas that stimulate thinking, guide the inquiry and are linked to outcomes.
  • Essential questions point to the “big ideas’ in the inquiry and should be considered and reconsidered as the inquiry progresses.
  • Answers to these questions form the evidence of learning at the end of study.
Students will use information to understand that:

  • Actions, behaviours, and relationships are learned and affected by the past.
  • Events and ideas from the past influence the present and can influence and serve as models of how to live as a contributing citizen.
  • People develop rules so that we can live together peacefully.
  • Rules have differing levels of impact so people who make rules need to consider the individual good and common good.
  • Diversity can have a variety of impacts and can impact points of view.
  • Individuals have the power to affect others and make a difference.
  • Canada has a long relationship with First Nations Peoples through treaty relationships.
  • Decisions have far-reaching effects, so it is important to think about the choices we make.
  • Active participation leads to belonging and symbols can support belonging.
  • People are connected to each other and to their environment and have a responsibility to take care of the world.

Throughout the year of study, students are learning that models, multidimensional and two dimensional, can represent real things.

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT

Students will know:

  • How rules are made.
  • Why rules are made.
  • How and who enforces rules.
  • What “common good” means.
  • Simple process to solve disputes.
  • Students will develop the ability to:
  • Categorize
  • Make comparisons
  • Identify consequences of rules or lack of rules
  • Look for alternate points of view

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

  • What makes a rule fair?
  • Why are rules different from place to place?
  • How do rules help people live peacefully together?
  • How do rules change?
  • How do I become an involved citizen?
Essential Questions are open-ended questions that are continually revisited, encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study, form the evidence of understanding and frame the assessment at the end of the study.

CURRICULUM OUTCOMES AND INDICATORS

Post student friendly outcomes throughout the inquiry and continually reference to remind students of the learning goals. .
Outcomes: (Sask. Curriculum/Student Friendly)
PA2.1
Analyze how decisions are made within the local community.
Indicators:

  • Review examples of communities to which students belong, and identify leaders in those communities (e.g., sports teams, artistic groups, school clubs, classroom, school, family).
  • Give examples of leadership in the local community, and describe ways leadership is demonstrated (e.g., mayor, reeve, chief, Elders, community volunteers).
  • Identify decision makers in the local community in government, economic, community, faith, and cultural organizations, and the roles of each.
  • Research processes for decision making in local community organizations, and describe similarities and differences.
  • Research formal decision-making process for governance of the local community.

PA2.2
Assess and practice various approaches to resolving conflicting interests within the community.
Indicators:

  • Recognize that the existence of conflicting interests does not necessarily result in conflict, and that harmonious communities resolve conflicting interests in peaceful ways.
  • Review processes for resolving conflicting interests in the classroom and school.
  • Identify possible sources of conflict in groups to which students belong, and in the community.
  • Identify and describe diverse viewpoints and perspectives in the local community.
  • Identify ways of maintaining safety and harmony within communities (e.g., police, firefighters, signage).
  • Investigate processes for resolving conflicting interests in the local government and community organizations.
  • Identify attributes of successful approaches to resolution of conflicting interests.
  • Apply successful approaches to resolving conflicting interests in the classroom and school communities.

PA2.3
Analyze rights and responsibilities of citizens in the school and local community.
Indicators:

  • Differentiate between the nature of the rights of children and of adult citizens in the community.
  • Identify Treaty rights of members of the community.
  • Relate the rights of citizens in the community to their responsibilities to the community.
  • Identify opportunities for sharing responsibility in the school and community.

Overarching Outcome
DR2.3
Identify physical representations as constructed models of real things./Understand that models, three dimensional and two dimensional, can represent real things.
Indicators:

  • Describe constructed features of the local community and examine the value and purpose of such constructions (e.g., bridges, buildings, statues, parks, water systems, roads).
  • Locate the local community on a map of Saskatchewan and Canada, and the community’s relative location on a globe.
  • Interpret basic features of maps and globes.
  • Interpret artistic representations of the land in and around the local community.

Part B: Learning Plan

In this inquiry students will:
Analyze how decisions are made and explore various approaches to resolving conflict by:

  • Understanding the different types of governance, their decision making process, and their responsibilities at the local and national levels; and,
  • Exploring the relationships between beliefs, rights, and responsibilities on a school, community, and national level.
  • Analyzing their rights and responsibilities within the community.

CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Curricular Outcomes

  • Analyze how decisions are made within the local community. (PA2.1)
  • Assess and practice various approaches to resolving conflicting interests within the community. (PA2.2)

Students will know how to make decisions, problem solve, and look for solutions to conflict in the community.

CURRICULUM OUTCOMES AND INDICATORS

Essential questions are posted and discussed with students at the start of the exploration of study. These open-ended questions are continually revisited; encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study; form the evidence of understanding; and, frame the assessment at the end of the unit of study. Guiding questions are posed to support student thinking as they explore the answers to the larger overarching questions.
Teachers may want to consider putting the questions into a “Before, During, After” chart to note the changes in students’ thinking as a result of the inquiries.
Essential Questions: Guiding Questions

  • What makes a rule fair?
    • Why might one person think a rule is fair and another think the same rule is unfair?
    • Do rules have the same impact on every person?
  • Why are rules different from place to place?
    • Why would rules need to change based on their location?
  • How do rules help people live peacefully together?
    • Do rules help or hinder?
  • How do rules change?
    • Why would a rule need to change?
  • What responsibility do citizens have to follow rules?

Vocabulary

  • common good
  • rule
  • rights
  • responsibility
  • engaged citizen
  • fair
  • community stewardship

CONNECT TO TOPIC AND SURFACE STUDENTS’ THINKING ABOUT …

This section introduces the concepts and helps teachers gain an understanding of the current thinking of the class.  Present essential questions and allow students to think about and talk about.  Student answers will give teachers a baseline or beginning understanding of the amount of specific and incidental teaching required to explore these outcomes. Vocabulary is introduced and noted here.  This section frames the “We do” portion of the lesson where teachers guide the initial structure of the inquiry.
Surface and note questions students raise during discussion. Identify additional vocabulary that needs to be developed.
Students will know how to make decisions and problem solve and look for solutions to conflict in the community.

Students belong to a number of groups that mirror the same structures as communities. Beginning with student groups and increasing the sphere of influence, list the groups that students belong to. Chart for future exploration. Within some of the student groups named, have students identify:

  • Who makes the rules in this community/organization/group? Who has to follow the rules?
  • What is the process for making rules?/How do they/does the group make the rules?
  • What is taken into consideration when making rules?/What do the rule-makers need to think about when making the rules?
  • Why would rules be considered fair/unfair?
  • What happens when people disagree with rules?
  • How does perspective or point of view influence how people view situations?/ Does everybody view the rules the same way?
  • How are disagreements solved?
DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson.  It describes the main activity(ies) involved.  In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that student make of the essential questions.  It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities. This forms the “We do” “They do” section of the inquiry where students are finding answers to the overarching questions and then searching for themes and patterns as possible explanations.
Students will develop an understanding of community governments and how rules are made.

Divide students into groups. Refer to the brainstormed list and assign student groups specific organizations to research. Make sure list includes local governance bodies as well as social or sports organizations. Look for opportunities to have community decision-makers visit the classroom or have students interview decision-makers.

For each group identify:

  • Leader of group and title (e.g., mayor, reeve, chief, Elders, community volunteers, coach).
  • Responsibilities of the leader/What the leader does.
  • How decisions are made:
    • Local community organizations?
    • Local community governance bodies?
  • Have students represent their findings in a chart or concept web for comparison against the class developed chart.
    • Note similarities and differences within the increasing sphere of influence.
  • What are the similarities and differences?
  • Why are there similarities? How does that support the groups?/society?
  • Identify patterns in how communities/organizations organize themselves and who the decision makers are within those groups.

Chart the responses and have students look for see the similarities and differences.

APPLY AND EXTEND KNOWLEDGE

This section includes ideas to extend the inquiry or apply concepts explored. This section may also include additional reflective questions to promote student connection to the topic.  This forms the “You do” section of the inquiry – may be “you do it collaboratively” or “you do it alone”.   Invite students to extend their thinking beyond the classroom discussions and inquiry experiences.  Pose additional reflective questions that have been raised to encourage critical and creative thinking.  
Resident Experts:

  • Chairperson of School Community Council
  • Council or RM member
  • Band Council member
Students will develop understanding that differing perspectives or points of view can impact how situations are viewed.

  • What makes a rule fair/unfair?
    • Brainstorm with students to identify rules they feel to be fair and then unfair. Begin with the classroom or school. Post those rules.
      • Why do students think the rules exist?
      • What is the purpose for the rule?
    • Have students develop criteria for what makes a rule fair. Using ‘fist to five’ rating have class vote on fairness of rule. (Fist means very unfair – five means very fair)
    • Does the entire class agree? What is the cause of the disagreement?
    • Identify differing perspectives that students have on specific rules. Examine the rule from a number of perspectives and have students either defend/justify the rule or dispute rule and offer alternatives.
    • Whenever possible have students consider whether the rule deals with rights or responsibilities or both.
  • Have students discuss the implications and consequences of life with or without rules. i.e. driving – rules of the road, school day starting/ending times, sporting rules
  • Students will understand the processes for dealing with conflict and examine strategies for conflict resolution. As a class:
    • Identify possible sources of conflict in groups to which students belong, and in the community. Hypothesize the differing points of view that different groups might have.
    • Review processes for resolving conflicting interests in the classroom and school. Chart those for reference.
    • Identify and describe diverse viewpoints and perspectives in the local community.
    • Hypothesize the differing points of view that different groups might have.
  • Students will recognize that the existence of conflicting interests does not necessarily result in conflict, and that harmonious communities resolve conflicting interests in peaceful ways. In groups have students research and investigate:
    • Processes for resolving conflicting interests in the local government and community organizations.
    • Structures and processes for informing people of rules and enforcing and maintaining the rules that communities develop. i.e. police, firefighters.
    • Ways of maintaining safety and harmony within communities (i.e. signage, media releases, newspapers.
    • Attributes of successful approaches to resolution of conflicting interests.
    • Have students develop a summary statement as to the efficacy of these approaches.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding.  Ideal demonstrations will be in authentic performance tasks.  Each citizenship study may have its own smaller assessment piece or be compiled to support one larger performance task assessment.  Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways.  Demonstrations of understanding may be done collaboratively or independently.
Have students reflect on their answers after citizenship exploration. Are their answers the same? Has their thinking changed?

  • Why might one person think a rule is fair and another think the same rule is unfair?
  • Do rules have the same impact on every person?
  • Why would rules need to change based on their location?
  • Do rules help or hinder society?
  • Why would a rule need to change?
  • What responsibility do citizens have to follow rules?

Students can also demonstrate understanding by:

  • Writing and/or illustrating rules for new situations or games. Identify what they considered in developing the rules for the game.
  • Listing/role playing what they would have to think about or do if they were put in a position of responsibility such as:
    • Looking after younger sibling when caregiver is called away briefly i.e. on the phone.
    • Teacher leaves room and puts you in charge.
  • Critique rules for point of view, purpose, fairness.
  • Justify, verbally or in writing, rules for the common good.

Informal Indicators of Understanding

  • Revisit K-W-L chart as a whole class to see if questions and ‘want to knows’ were addressed
  • In language arts have students:
    • Analyze relationships in readings to determine whether the relationship is positive or negative.
    • Identify possible points of view and provide evidence to support thinking
  • Note when students:
    • Can articulate behaviour as negative or positive and can provide an alternate suggestion for behaving.
    • Can identify a possible point of view as an alternate reason for the behaviour.
    • Can apply successful approaches to resolving conflicting interests in the classroom and school communities.

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES

Students are keeping a Citizenship Journal to reflect upon their developing views of citizenship.  This section provides prompts for student journals.  Students are invited to choose one that interests them or propose their own. Students can also respond to any of the essential questions.

Students are encouraged to respond using a variety of genres.

  • What would your world be like without rules?
  • Is it important for rule-makers to think about point of view of the people who have to follow the rules? Why do you think the way you do?
  • How good are rule makers at their jobs? Why do you think the way you do?
  • Would you like a job as a rule maker? What organization/group would that be for? Why do you think you would like that job?

LEARNING PLAN

As teachers work with students to develop meaning it is important to reinforce the following connections to long-term independent accomplishments.

CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Students will be able to:

  • Examine rules for fairness, purpose, and determine/consider perspective of rule makers.
  • Identify common good.
  • Consider alternate points of view/perspective.
  • Develop roots of empathy by being able to understand another person’s point of view.

Curricular Outcomes

PA2.3 – Analyze rights and responsibilities of citizens in the school and local community.

Essential Questions – Guiding questions:

Present essential questions to students at the start of the exploration of study.  As students make meaning of the outcomes, the answers to these questions will frame their thinking at the end of the unit of study.

Essential questions are presented in bold followed by the guiding questions that are more directly connection to student learning outcomes.

  • What makes a rule fair?
    • What makes something a right?
    • Do all people have the same access to rights?
  • Why are rules different from place to place?
    • Do rights have an age limit?
    • Do responsibilities have an age limit?
  • How do rules help people live peacefully together?
    • How do people support and protect rights?
  • How do rules change?
    • Do rights ever change?
  • How do I become an engaged citizen?
    • What responsibility do citizens have to protect rights?

CONNECT TO TOPIC AND SURFACE STUDENTS’ THINKING ABOUT …

This section introduces the concepts and helps teachers gain an understanding of the current thinking of the class.  Present essential questions and allow students to think about and talk about.  Student answers will give teachers a baseline or beginning understanding of the amount of specific and incidental teaching required to explore these outcomes. Vocabulary is introduced and noted here.  This section frames the “We do” portion of the lesson where teachers guide the initial structure of the inquiry.
Determine what the students know, understand, need to be able to do to master/answer the essential questions:

  • What is the difference between rights and responsibilities?
  • Can people have rights without responsibilities?
  • What responsibilities do I have toward my community?
  • Are rights and responsibilities connected to a specific age?
  • Surface questions that students have.
  • Identify vocabulary understandings that must be developed.
    • Rights, responsibilities.
  • Create Know, Want to Know, Learned chart to track learning throughout citizenship study.
DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson.  It describes the main activity(ies) involved.  In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that student make of the essential questions.  It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities. This forms the “We do” “They do” section of the inquiry where students are finding answers to the overarching questions and then searching for themes and patterns as possible explanations.
Students will develop understanding of the difference between rights and responsibilities and begin to explore the concept of community stewardship.

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms is a binding legal document that protects the basic human rights of all Canadians. It gives a list of the rights to which all Canadians are allowed and describes the Government’s responsibility to make sure those rights happen. The Charter is often used in legal cases that deal with human rights issues. The Charter gives strong advice about how Canada’s laws and the justice system should work to make sure Canadians can have their fundamental rights and freedoms.

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees:

  • fundamental freedoms such as freedom of thought, speech, and association,
  • democratic rights such as the right to vote,
  • mobility rights such as the right to enter, remain in, and leave Canada,
  • legal rights, equality rights equality before the law and protection against discrimination,
  • language rights, and
  • the rights of Canada’s Indigenous peoples.

The Federal Government and every Canadian province have laws that deal with human rights, as well as human rights commissions to manage those laws. In Saskatchewan it is called the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission. The provincial commissions work together to make sure that the rights of every Canadian are protected and that all people are treated with equality and respect. (Information compiled from http://www.unac.org/rights/actguide/canada.html : retrieved July 2013)
Retrieved from: http://archive.is/MY99J – Nov. 2017

  • Have students provide real life examples of the rights adults have according to the government charter.
  • Have students develop summary statements about what the Canadian government believes about the importance of human rights.
  • Compare the United Nations Rights of the Child Document and the specific areas of rights found in Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Chart the similarities and differences.
  • Differentiate between the nature of the rights of children and of adult citizens in the community.
  • Relate the rights of citizens in the community to their responsibilities to the community.
    • How do adults protect rights in the community?
    • What responsibilities do adults have in the community?
    • How are those responsibilities connected to the rights of children?
    • How do children protect rights in the community?
    • What responsibilities do children have in the community?

Students will understand that when people work to collectively make the community a stronger better place this is called community stewardship.

  • Community stewardship is protecting and supporting the community without getting paid for your efforts.
  • Identify opportunities for sharing responsibility for looking after the school and community.

APPLY AND EXTEND KNOWLEDGE

This section includes ideas to extend the inquiry or apply concepts explored. This section may also include additional reflective questions to promote student connection to the topic.  This forms the “You do” section of the inquiry – may be “you do it collaboratively” or “you do it alone”.   Invite students to extend their thinking beyond the classroom discussions and inquiry experiences.  Pose additional reflective questions that have been raised to encourage critical and creative thinking.
  • Students will develop an understanding that treaties are promises to act and individuals have a responsibility to follow through on their promises.
  • Students will explore the connection between treaty rights and responsibilities.
    • Identify the Treaty area in which your school resides.
    • Read through Treaty information from the Treaty Kits to find what terms were negotiated within your specific Treaty area. See also: http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/aboriginal-treaties/
    • Have First Nations elders come into the classroom to talk about the rights that were negotiated through treaty and the responsibilities that are connected to treaty.
    • Have community leaders give their perspectives on the rights and responsibilities negotiated through treaty.
    • Have students identify the similarities and differences between the two perspectives.
    • Have students develop summary statements about Treaty rights and responsibilities.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding.  Ideal demonstrations will be in authentic performance tasks.  Each citizenship study may have its own smaller assessment piece or be compiled to support one larger performance task assessment.  Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways.  Demonstrations of understanding may be done collaboratively or independently.
Have students give their answers to the essential questions that guided student thinking throughout the citizenship study. Monitor growth and changes in student understanding.

  • What makes something a right?
  • Do all people have the same access to rights?
  • Do rights have an age limit?
  • Do responsibilities have an age limit?
  • How do people support and protect rights?
  • Do rights ever change?
  • What responsibility do citizens have to protect rights?
  • Have students give examples of community stewardship that they can undertake.
  • Have students develop a community stewardship for the school or community.

Informal Indicators of Understanding

  • Revisit K-W-L chart as classroom to see if questions and ‘want to knows’ were addressed.
  • Track the amount of community stewardship students engage in.
  • Challenge other classes to demonstrate examples of community stewardship.

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES

Students are keeping a Citizenship Journal to reflect upon their developing views of citizenship.  This section provides prompts for student journals.  Students are invited to choose one that interests them or propose their own. Students can also respond to any of the essential questions.

Students are encouraged to respond using a variety of genres.

  • What responsibility do citizens have to protect rights?
  • What responsibility do citizens have for community stewardship?
  • What will you do with your new learning?

Part C: Engaged Citizens Resources

RESOURCES

CROSS CURRICULAR CONNECTIONS

Language Arts
Themes

  • Personal and Philosophical: Students will:
    • believe in their own self-worth and feel that they have control over the things that happen to them;
    • look inward and focus on self-image and self-esteem; and,
    • reflect on self and life, and on their beliefs and values and those of their society.
  • Social, Cultural, and Historical: Students will:
    • look outward and examine their relationships with others, their community, and the world;
    • consider the social and historical context;
    • explore their connections in families, schools, groups, and communities to understand the diverse needs and wants of others; and,
    • show concern for other people in their relationships, groups, and communities.
  • Communicative: Students will:
    • consider the role of communication in their lives and the technologies and strategies that help people become effective communicators; and,
    • practice the skills to interact effectively with others.
  • Environmental and Technological: Students will:
    • explore the elements of the natural and constructed worlds and the role of technology and related developments in their society; and,
    • explore the needs and characteristics of living things; properties of objects and materials; the five senses; and daily seasonal changes.

Health – Decision Making
Understanding, Skills, and Confidences (USC)

  • USC2.4 Examine social and personal meanings of “respect” and establish ways to show respect for self, persons, living things, possessions, and the environment.
  • USC2.6 Examine how communities benefit from the diversity of their individual community members.

Action Planning (AP)

  • AP2.1 Act upon health-related understandings, skills, and confidences to make healthy connections related to personal thoughts-feelings-actions, healthy snacking, affects of illness/disease, respect, safety, and diversity

Treaty Education

  • TR2: Examine how the Treaties are the basis for harmonious relationships in which land and resources are shared.
  • SI2: Recognize the importance of honesty when examining one’s intentions.
  • HC2: Analyze the traditional forms of leadership that were in practice prior to European contact and in First Nations communities.
  • TPP2: Develop an understanding of Treaties as sacred promises that exist between the British Crown and First Nations.

GRADE 2 CITIZENSHIP STUDIES LIFELONG LEARNING CITIZENS

Part A: Curricular Connections and Background

BROAD AREA OF CITIZENSHIP

Lifelong Learning Citizens understand the dynamics of change and seek information about issues so they can act as engaged and responsible citizens. This area of citizenship study develops student’s skills, attitudes, and knowledge to assist them in understanding change and the impact that change has on individuals, homes, schools, and the community. Lifelong learning citizens understand that the world is constantly shifting and everyone continues to learn to adjust to new situations.
Students are asked to make meaning of matters explored and consider their response as active citizens, so awareness of the processes of critical thinking are fundamental to developing an accurate understanding of the issues.

DESIRED RESULTS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

The far-reaching effects of diversity expand from the individual to the community and beyond. Students will begin to understand the range of reactions that diversity creates in citizens. Students will continue to develop and refine the impact that diversity has on the development of differing viewpoints.
Students will further develop their understanding of how past events influence current beliefs and practices. They will extend their study of commitments made in the treaties and try to identify how those promises impact First Nations and Métis communities today.
Understanding the influence of choice on actions and behaviours continues. Students are asked to reflect on their activities and personal choices to determine the effects of their choices in the world. They will further explore change processes in an effort to understand how to implement personal change and support behavioural change in others.

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Grade 2 students will examine how history has impacted and contributed to the development of current communities. Students will begin to understand the various effects of historical events on the development of their community and province including the impact of Treaty negotiations and First Nations and Métis people on their community. Finally students will further examine their present behaviours to understand how their actions affect others and begin to initiate personal change.
  • Enduring understandings are the big ideas that stimulate thinking, guide the inquiry and are linked to outcomes.
  • Essential questions point to the “big ideas’ in the inquiry and should be considered and reconsidered as the inquiry progresses.
  • Answers to these questions form the evidence of learning at the end of study.
Students will use information to understand that:

  • Actions, behaviours, and relationships are learned and affected by the past.
  • Events and ideas from the past influence the present and can influence and serve as models of how to live as a contributing citizen.
  • People develop rules so that we can live together peacefully.
  • Rules have differing levels of impact so people who make rules need to consider the individual good and common good.
  • Diversity can have a variety of impacts and can impact points of view.
  • Individuals have the power to affect others and make a difference.
  • Canada has a long relationship with First Nations Peoples through treaty relationships.
  • Decisions have far-reaching effects, so it is important to think about the choices we make.
  • Active participation leads to belonging and symbols can support belonging;
  • People are connected to each other and to their environment and have a responsibility to take care of the world.

Throughout the year of study, students are learning that models, multidimensional and two dimensional, can represent real things.

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT

Students will:

  • Practice different steps and processes to solve problems
  • Consider how present actions will affect future choices
  • Consider the impact of culture on behaviours and worldview
  • Become aware of their thinking
  • Consider the perspectives of others when trying to understand behaviours.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

  • How are present events related to past events?
  • How does the past influence your present? Your future?
  • What is my behaviour saying about what I think?
  • Is my behaviour planned or am I reacting?
Essential Questions are open-ended questions that are continually revisited, encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study, form the evidence of understanding and frame the assessment at the end of the study.

CURRICULUM OUTCOMES AND INDICATORS

Outcomes: Sask. Curriculum/Student Friendly

Students will:

IN2.2
Create a representation of the diversity of cultural groups in the local community/understand the different groups of people who make up their community.
Indicators:

  • Describe diverse characteristics within the school and local communities, and diverse similarities within and between diverse groups.
  • Retell the shared experiences and stories of members of the local community experienced through active listening, viewing, and reading of stories in various formats.
  • Identify the significance of a variety of cultural traditions, festivals, and celebrations in the school and local communities.
  • Describe ways in which diverse individuals and groups contribute to the well-being of the local community (e.g., store keepers, medical practitioners, law enforcement personnel, school support workers, spiritual or faith leaders, artisans, trades people, bus drivers, community maintenance workers).

RW 2.2
Analyze various worldviews regarding the natural environment/understand how worldview impacts the use of the natural environment.
Indicators:

  • Investigate traditional First Nations worldviews of the relationship between humanity and the environment.
  • Describe traditional western European worldviews of the relationship between humanity and the environment.
  • Investigate traditional Métis worldviews of the natural environment.
  • Assess worldviews of how to achieve balance and harmony.
  • Describe current worldviews in the community of the relationship between humanity and the natural environment.

DR2.1
Investigate stories of significant events and persons in the local community’s history to describe the contribution of those who lived in the community in earlier times/learn about the history of the local community to understand the contributions of community members.
Indicators:

  • Plan and implement a process to learn about the past experiences of members of the local community (e.g., talk to long term residents, view pictures or other artistic interpretations, visit an historic site).
  • Research and represent the history of the local school and the local community (e.g., events, people).
  • Describe events of the past in the local community that affect life today (e.g., Why was the current locations chosen for the school? Other buildings? Why are streets or buildings names as they are?).
  • Represent ways in which life in the local community has changed over time (e.g., change of place names, demographics, services, industries, businesses, transportation networks).
  • Research the origins of, and reasons for, the names of public sites and landmarks in the local community (e.g., streets, rivers, buildings, parks).
  • Research the heritage of various individuals and groups within the community, and why people came to live in the community.

DR2.4
Describe the influence of Treaty and First Nations and/or Métis, and Inuit peoples on the local community.
Indicators:

  • Share stories of the heritage of the community.
  • Investigate the relationship of traditional First Nations to the land.
  • Identify on a map the Treaty territory within which the local community is situated.
  • Describe the reasons for Treaty from the perspective of the First Nations and the government.
  • Trace the evolution of the Treaty relationship in the community.
  • Present oral, visual, or other interpretations or representation of historical understanding gained through oral history.

Overarching Outcome
DR2.3
Identify physical representations as constructed models of real things/understand that models, three dimensional and two dimensional, can represent real things.
Indicators:

  • Describe constructed features of the local community and examine the value and purpose of such constructions (e.g., bridges, buildings, statues, parks, water systems, roads).
  • Locate the local community on a map of Saskatchewan and Canada, and the community’s relative location on a globe.
  • Interpret basic features of maps and globes.
  • Interpret artistic representations of the land in and around the local community.

Part B: Learning Plan

In this inquiry students will:

  • Learn about their community history with emphasis on the impact of First Nation and Métis influences to understand how the past impacts their community today.
  • Learn about the diversity that exists in their community and consider how it impacts the present community.
  • Consider the similarities between cultures and cultural traditions.

CITIZENSHIP STUDY

  • Investigate stories of significant events and persons in the local community’s history to describe the contribution of those who lived in the community in earlier times. (DR2.1)
    • Students will learn the history of important events and people in their community to understand the impact on the community.
  • Describe the influence of Treaty and First Nations and/or Métis, and Inuit peoples on the local community. (DR2.4)
  • Create a representation of the diversity of cultural groups in the local community. (IN2.2)
    • Students will be able to talk about the diversity of cultures in the community and understand how cultures are both similar and different.

QUESTIONS TO GUIDE INQUIRY

Process

  • Pose the essential and guiding questions and allow students to discuss their thoughts on the matter.
  • Determine what the students know, understand, need to be able to do to master/answer the essential questions (connect to content). Additional guiding questions can be added as required. Students are encouraged to add their questions to the others.
  • Create Know, Want to know, Learned Chart – identify vocabulary that requires development
  • Surface any additional questions students might have as a result of their discussions about the essential questions.
  • Post student answers for reflection at end of study.

Essential Questions – Guiding Questions:

  • How are present events related to past events?
    • How is the present community/town/city structure related to the past?/How has this community changed over the years?
    • What were the influences on the community of interactions with/working with/living alongside surrounding First Nation’s communities, Métis communities, Inuit (if appropriate) communities?
    • How did the heroes/important community contributors/veterans contribute to their community?
    • How did the hero’s/important community contributor’s/veteran’s point of view influence their behaviour?
    • What story does their behaviour tell? (How does my background/point of view influence my behaviour?)
  • How does the past influence your present behaviour, current ideas/thinking, your future behaviour, ideas/thinking?
    • Why is this community organized the way it is?
    • Why does this community celebrate the things it does?
    • How did the past history contribute to the present community organization? celebrations?
  • How does my background/point of view influence my behaviour?
    • What kind of person am I?
    • Why do I act the way I do?
  • What story is my behaviour telling?
    • What story does the community stewardship tell about this community?

Vocabulary

  • culture
  • traditions
  • point of view
  • diversity
  • responsibility
  • community stewardship

CONNECT TO TOPIC AND SURFACE STUDENTS’ THINKING ABOUT …

This section introduces the concepts and helps teachers gain an understanding of the current thinking of the class.  Present essential questions and allow students to think about and talk about.  Student answers will give teachers a baseline or beginning understanding of the amount of specific and incidental teaching required to explore these outcomes. Vocabulary is introduced and noted here.  This section frames the “We do” portion of the lesson where teachers guide the initial structure of the inquiry.
Brainstorm with students places to look for information about the past i.e. people – elders, long-term residents, local history books, picture books, community/city records.
These people become the resident experts and will be resources for student exploration/research. Research could also be done in the form of interviews with the class.
Students will learn the history of important events and people in their community to understand the impact of community stewardship. They will develop an understanding of the history of their community and the contributions of people to their community. (Community refers to group of people living together and supporting one another and includes village, reserve, town, city)

  • How did this community get its name?
  • Why is this community located here?
  • How old is this community?
  • How many people live in this community? Has this number changed in 10 years?
  • What are important places in this community?
  • Who helped to build this community?
  • What celebrations do we honour in this community?
  • Veterans, inventions, partnerships with surrounding communities, etc.
  • What important people or events are connected with the community?

What questions do students have about their community? Post and add to the questions.

DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson.  It describes the main activity(ies) involved.  In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that student make of the essential questions.  It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities.
Jigsaw Research and Study Process
Divide class into groups according to their interests and give each group a specific area to learn about and present to class. Each group must find out the information in the question posed below and present their findings to the class. Encourage students to present information learned in a variety of modes including speaking, writing, drama, multimedia, or other modes so that all students have an entrance point for demonstrating their learning and understanding.

  • Location: What is the history of the location of the community (Reserve/Town site/City)?
    • Why was the location chosen?
    • How old is this community?
    • How has the community changed and why?
  • Demographics: Who lives in this community?
    • How many people?
    • How has the number of people living in the community changed?
    • Where do most of the residents come from (heritage)?
    • Why do the residents choose to come to the community? How has that changed?
  • Community Heroes/Stewards: Who are the people in this community who have something named after them? What is the story?
    • People who have made a significant contribution to their community are often honoured by having buildings, streets, parks, etc. named after them.
    • Identify possible names for study. Consider veterans, historians, business people, former leaders, chiefs, etc.
  • Services provided: What services does the community provide to support its citizens?
    • What are the services?
    • How long have those services been provided?
    • How have those services changed over the years? Why have they changed?
  • Local Community Influences: What were the influences of the local First Nation and Métis communities?
    • Who were the communities who traded with local community?
    • What partnerships did the community have with neighbour communities?
    • How did they work together?
    • What did they learn from each other?
  • How the past history has impacted the present?
  • How have our past connections with neighbour communities impacted us?
  • What does the way this community honours the contributions of citizens say about the importance of the past?
  • What does the way this community honours the contributions of citizens say about community stewardship? (Looking after and respecting our community.)

APPLY AND EXTEND KNOWLEDGE

This section includes ideas to extend the inquiry or apply concepts explored. This section may also include additional reflective questions to promote student connection to the topic.  This forms the “You do” section of the inquiry – may be “you do it collaboratively” or “you do it alone”.   Invite students to extend their thinking beyond the classroom discussions and inquiry experiences.  Pose additional reflective questions that have been raised to encourage critical and creative thinking.  
  • Students will understand how diversity impacts the present and future of community. They will also learn that cultural practices that have their roots in history or another country are constantly changing and often have many similarities.
    Using the information learned about the demographics of the community in the earlier study identify:

    • the various cultural groups in the community
    • the cultural traditions, festivals, and celebrations that the community celebrates
    • similarities and differences between the group celebrations, remembrances
  • How have the different cultures, traditions changed the community?

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding.  Ideal demonstrations will be in authentic performance tasks.  Each citizenship study may have its own smaller assessment piece or be compiled to support one larger performance task assessment.  Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways.  Demonstrations of understanding may be done collaboratively or independently.
Following are the essential questions that students have been exploring throughout this unit of citizenship study.

  • Have students develop their answers to the questions below based on information they learned from the history fair (jigsaw research and representation process).
    • How did the past contribute to the present changes in the community?
    • How did the heroes/important community contributors/veterans/neighbour communities contribute to their community? What story does their behaviour tell?
    • What story does the community history tell about community stewardship?
    • Tell how the diversity of cultures and individuals have changed and contributed to the well-being of the community i.e. – occupations, artistic community, etc.
  • Allow students to identify ways to present their thinking that will demonstrate their understanding.
  • Revisit K-W-L chart as a whole class to see if questions and ‘want to knows’ were addressed.

LEARNING PLAN

In this inquiry students will:

  • Examine the history of their community and consider the impact of Indigenous people on community development.
  • Examine their understandings of Indigenous people as engaged citizens.

CITIZENSHIP INQUIRY

QUESTIONS TO GUIDE INQUIRY

Questions are posted and discussed with students at the start of the exploration of study. These open-ended questions are continually revisited; encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study; form the evidence of understanding; and, frame the assessment at the end of the unit of study. Guiding questions are posed to support student thinking as they explore the answers to the larger overarching questions.

Essential Questions – Guiding Questions:

  • How are present events related to past events?
    • What is the Indigenous history in this community?
    • What impact does Indigenous history have on this community?
    • What impact do First Nations, Métis traditional teachings have on the way land is used in the community?
  • How does my background/point of view influence my behaviour?
    • What are my community’s Treaty responsibilities?
    • How are Treaty responsibilities/relationships honoured in the community?
    • How do First Nations traditional teachings/ traditional connections to the land contribute to community strength?
  • What is my behaviour saying about what I think? (What story is my behaviour telling?)
    • What does the community behaviour toward Treaty obligations say about what we think about the contributions of Indigenous people to our community?
    • What story is told in the way that Treaty relationships are honoured?
  • Is my behaviour planned or am I reacting?
    • How can I control my behaviour?
    • How can I change my behaviour?
  • How does the past influence your present? Your future?
    • What are your individual Treaty responsibilities/obligations?
  • How does the past influence your present? Your future?
    • What can individual students do to honour treaty obligations?
    • What were the needs that each of the Treaty parties were trying to meet when they negotiated treaties?
DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson.  It describes the main activity(ies) involved.  In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that student make of the essential questions.  It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities.
Curricular Outcomes

  • Describe the influence of Treaty, First Nations, Métis and/or Inuit people on the local community. (DR2.4)
  • Students will understand the impact of Treaty and the contributions of First Nations, Métis, and/or Inuit people on the community.
  • Create Know, Want to Know, Learned Chart – Chart additional questions students want to learn answers to.
  • In what treaty area is this school?
    • Identify on a map the Treaty territory within which the local community is situated.
  • Who are the First Nations people in this treaty area?
    • What is their history?
    • Who are their heroes/leaders?
    • What are the stories they tell?
  • What do the First Nations people who live in this area believe about the land?
    • How should the land be treated?
    • Who owns the land?
  • Why were treaties negotiated?
    • Have students find out when their treaty was signed
    • What problem needed to be fixed?
      • Describe from the First Nation’s point of view.
      • Describe from the government’s point of view.
  • How have Treaty promises been honoured in the community?
    • Have students discover how the community/province has honoured treaty responsibilities i.e. First Nations Schools, Health Centres, etc.
  • How do First Nations traditional teachings/ traditional connections to the land contribute to community strength?
    • What are First Nations connections/contributions/legacy to your community?

Divide students into groups and have them research the answers to the questions posed above. Students are encouraged to invite Elders and Knowledge Keepers into their classrooms or, in keeping with sense of place, visit reserves and band schools to talk with people and conduct their research.

Teacher Background

  • First Nations peoples had a close relationship with the land. They shared a common view that humans were one small part of the creation and the most dependent of all entities. Humans were not superior to the rivers, forests, animals, and plants. They believed that the Creator gave them everything they needed but they were to take only what they needed to live. First Nations peoples knew that they had to adapt to the land rather than altering or transforming the land to suit their needs. First Nations peoples believed that the land could not be owned by any one nation and that the land could be shared through agreements made with one another. First Nations peoples believed that any treaties between nations could not involve any transfer of “title” to the land.
    Source: Grade 2 Teaching Treaties in the Classroom pg. 19
  • First Nations peoples believed that the creator provided them with everything they needed to survive. In return, they were to live in balance and harmony with nature. In their worldview, all things had spirits and were intimately connected with the Creator. They prayed and gave thanks to the Creator every day.
    Source: Grade 2 Teaching Treaties in the Classroom pg. 25
  • First Nations were going through a period of transition due to the influences of the newcomers such as disease, decline of the buffalo, decline of the fur trade. First Nations leaders needed to provide for their people. The British Crown wanted access to more land and resources. They were also afraid that the United States would expand into the west and northern parts of Canada. Both the British Crown and First Nations wanted to avoid the confrontations and wars that were happening in the United States.
    Source: Teaching Treaties in the Classroom
  • First Nations worldview represents a unique perspective of the world and the interconnectedness to one another in the circle of life. Each Nation has their own ceremonies, protocols, and ways of relating and living this perspective. The main element of the worldview is to live in harmony with all created things and to ensure that all is in balance with one another. The worldview considers all things of the natural world to have a spirit, equally valued and that we cannot live one without the other. We experience worldview through oral traditions, ceremonial practices, stories, and dance. There is a balance of the spiritual, physical, emotional, and intellectual self. First Nation peoples acknowledge the Creator as the giver of life.
    Source: The information is constructed from the teachings of Nehiyawak Elders of Treaty 6. Permission for use from Living Sky School Division.
  • For additional information teachers can also reference https://treaty6education.lskysd.ca the document Integrating Aboriginal Perspectives into Curricula, specifically pg. 7 -12 on Culture and Worldview retrieved from: http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/docs/policy/abpersp/ab_persp.pdf on Oct. 2017.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding.  Ideal demonstrations will be in authentic performance tasks.  Each citizenship study may have its own smaller assessment piece or be compiled to support one larger performance task assessment.  Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways.  Demonstrations of understanding may be done collaboratively or independently.

Then Demonstrate your Understanding…

  • How are present events related to past events?
    • What impact does Indigenous history have on this community? Province?
    • What impact do First Nations, Métis traditional teachings have on the way land is used in the community?/province?
    • How do First Nations traditional teachings/ traditional connections to the land contribute to community strength? /provincial strength?
  • How does my background/point of view influence my behaviour?
    • How are Treaty responsibilities/relationships honoured in the community?/province?
    • What does that behaviour demonstrate?
  • How does the past influence your present? your future?
    • What are my individual Treaty responsibilities/obligations?
    • What can individual students do to honour treaty obligations?

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES

Students are keeping a Citizenship Journal to reflect upon their developing views of citizenship.  This section provides prompts for student journals.  Students are invited to choose one that interests them or propose their own. Students can also respond to any of the essential questions.

Students are encouraged to respond using a variety of genres.

  • Think of a story of your family’s history that makes you proud. Tell the story and tell why it makes you proud.
  • Think of a story of history that makes you proud. Tell the story and tell why it makes you proud.

Remember you can tell this story through any kind of representation, art, music, dance, video, etc.

Part C: Lifelong Learning Citizen Resources

RESOURCES

All websites were accessed November 2017.

CROSS CURRICULAR CONNECTIONS

Language Arts
Themes

  • Personal and Philosophical: Students will:
    • believe in their own self-worth and feel that they have control over the things that happen to them;
    • look inward and focus on self-image and self-esteem; and,
    • reflect on self and life, and on their beliefs and values and those of their society.
  • Social, Cultural, and Historical: Students will:
    • look outward and examine their relationships with others, their community, and the world;
    • consider the social and historical context;
    • explore their connections in families, schools, groups, and communities to understand the diverse needs and wants of others; and,
    • show concern for other people in their relationships, groups, and communities.
  • Communicative: Students will:
    • consider the role of communication in their lives and the technologies and strategies that help people become effective communicators; and,
    • practice the skills to interact effectively with others.
  • Environmental and Technological: Students will:
    • explore the elements of the natural and constructed worlds and the role of technology and related developments in their society; and,
    • explore the needs and characteristics of living things; properties of objects and materials; the five senses; and daily seasonal changes.

Treaty Education

The students will gain knowledge of the history of treaties in Canada leading to the Numbered Treaties in Saskatchewan.

  • TR2: Examine how the Treaties are the basis for harmonious relationships in which land and resources are shared.
  • SI2: Recognize the importance of honesty when examining one’s intentions.
  • HC2: Analyze the traditional forms of leadership that were in practice prior to European contact and in First Nations communities.
  • TPP2: Develop an understanding of Treaties as sacred promises that exist between the British Crown (i.e., government) and First Nations.

Health

  • Understanding, Skills, and Confidences (USC)
  • USC2.4 Examine social and personal meanings of “respect” and establish ways to show respect for self, persons, living things, possessions, and the environment.
  • USC2.6 Examine how communities benefit from the diversity of their individual community members.
  • Action Planning (AP)
  • AP2.1 Act upon health-related understandings, skills, and confidences to make healthy connections related to personal thoughts-feelings-actions, healthy snacking, affects of illness/disease, respect, safety, and diversity

Science

  • Life Science: Animal Growth and Changes (AN)
  • AN2.3 Assess the interdependence of humans and animals in natural and constructed environments. [CP, DM]
  • Earth and Space Science: Air and Water in the Environment (AW)
  • AW2.2 Assess the importance of air and water for the health and survival of living things, including self, and the environment. [CP, DM]

GRADE 2 CITIZENSHIP STUDIES SELF, COMMUNITY, AND PLACE

Part A: Curricular Connections and Background

BROAD AREA OF CITIZENSHIP

Citizens with a Strong Sense of Self, Community, and Place explore the relationship that citizens have with themselves and others, their communities – local, regional, provincial, national, and global, and their developed sense of place. Being a member of any community brings with it certain rights; however, it also brings with it certain responsibilities to protect those rights and privileges. A person’s “sense of place” develops through experience and knowledge of the history, geography and geology of an area, the legends of a place, and a sense of the land and its history after living there for a time. Developing a sense of place helps students identify with their region and with each other. A strong sense of place can lead to more sensitive stewardship of our cultural history and natural environment.
In this area of study, students will examine the responsibilities that are inherent in all of these relationships. This area of citizenship invites students to act on issues that are explored so that they can move toward becoming justice-oriented citizens. Because this area of citizenship begins with self and exploring issues of citizenship it is the primary area of focus for primary and elementary students.

OVERVIEW AND DESIRED RESULTS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Grade 2 students will continue to examine the relationship between needs, wants, and responsibilities. As students understand the reliance of humans on the community and the environment, and the responsibility to care for their surroundings and society they are developing the concept of community stewardship. Stewardship is supported through active participation in looking after the community. Ongoing examination of their relationships with their communities leads to further exploration of ways in which they can care for their environment.
Students continue to develop their skills of respect for themselves and others and understand that opinions are developed through personal experiences. They are developing skills of respect and find ways of dealing with differences of opinion.
Students begin to explore processes for initiating and guiding change in their community with respect to environmental, social, and economic issues. They learn how various community groups influence decisions.
Appreciation for national, provincial, and community symbols and traditions of citizenship are expanded.

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Citizens with a strong sense of Self, Community, and Place treat self and others with respect, have a sense of belonging to their home, family, and school community, and interact with, learn from, and care for the local environment.
  • Enduring understandings are the big ideas that stimulate thinking, guide the inquiry and are linked to outcomes.
  • Essential questions point to the “big ideas’ in the inquiry and should be considered and reconsidered as the inquiry progresses.
  • Answers to these questions form the evidence of learning at the end of study.
Students will use information to understand that:

  • Actions, behaviours, and relationships are learned and affected by the past.
  • Events and ideas from the past influence the present and can influence and serve as models of how to live as a contributing citizen.
  • People develop rules so that we can live together peacefully.
  • Rules have differing levels of impact so people who make rules need to consider the individual good and common good.
  • Diversity can have a variety of impacts and can impact points of view
  • Individuals have the power to affect others and make a difference.
  • Canada has a long relationship with First Nations Peoples through treaty relationships.
  • Decisions have far-reaching effects, so it is important to think about the choices we make.
  • Active participation leads to belonging and symbols can support belonging;
  • People are connected to each other and to their environment and have a responsibility to take care of the world.

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT

Students will:

  • Discriminate between needs and wants
  • Recognize Canadian symbols – provincial and national
  • Become aware of their thinking and develop and practice skills of empathy, advocacy
  • Develop and practice skills of treating self and others with respect
  • Develop conflict resolution skills
  • Begin to develop positive environmental habits.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

  • How do needs differ from wants?
  • How can symbols provide a sense of belonging and unity?
  • What responsibilities do I have to my community?
  • What responsibilities do I have to my environment?
Essential Questions are open-ended questions that are continually revisited, encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study, form the evidence of understanding and frame the assessment at the end of the study.

CURRICULUM OUTCOMES AND INDICATORS

Outcomes: (Sask. Curriculum)
IN2.1
Determine the characteristics of the community.
Indicators:

  • Identify and record characteristics common to the school community (e.g., Who leads the school community? Who keeps the school community clean and physically pleasant? What kinds of special events happen in the school community?).
  • Compile a list of various communities to which students belong (e.g., cultural, recreational, faith, sports, arts).
  • Compare characteristics of other communities to which students belong with those of the school community, identifying the similarities in meeting needs and achieving common purpose.
  • Identify needs met by the local community that cannot be met independently or individually, and describe the concept of interdependence.
  • Create an inventory of ways in which individuals and groups contribute to the well-being of the school and local community.
  • Identify characteristics common to local communities (e.g., transportation and communication networks, educational and health care systems, culture, sport, and recreation infrastructure).
  • Create a representation exemplifying interdependence within the local community.

RW2.1
Describe ways in which the local community meets needs and wants of its members.
Indicators:

  • Define the term resource, and inventory resources in the community that help to meet needs and wants.
  • Investigate how quality of life is influenced by individuals, businesses, and groups in the local community.

RW2.3
Contribute to initiating and guiding change in local and global communities regarding environmental, social, and economic sustainability.
Indicators:

  • Represent through visual art, music, dance, writing, or other forms, the contribution of individuals and communities to initiate change that supports sustainability.
  • Investigate how individual local consumer choices may affect people elsewhere in the world (e.g., child labour, enslavement, sweat shops, consumption of scarce resources, prosperity through employment).
  • Develop a classroom action plan for harmonizing personal lifestyles with collective needs regarding social, environmental, and economic sustainability.

DR2.2
Analyze the influence of the natural environment on the local community.
Indicators:

  • Describe natural features of the local community and speculate upon their importance (e.g., landforms, climate, vegetation, waterways).
  • Compile examples of natural resources in the local community and explain the importance of conserving or restoring natural resources.
  • Inventory ways in which the natural environment influences lifestyles of the local community.
  • Identify ways that technology has been and is used to enable people to adapt to the natural environment (e.g., building technology, clothing, industrial equipment, personal care).
  • Illustrate ways in which the natural landscape shapes daily life in the local community.

DR 2.4
Describe the influence of Treaty and First Nations people on the local community.
Indicators:

  • Share stories of the heritage of the community.
  • Investigate the relationship of traditional First Nations to the land.
  • Identify on a map the Treaty territory within which the local community is situated.
  • Describe the reasons for Treaty from the perspective of the First Nations and the government.
  • Trace the evolution of the Treaty relationship in the community.
  • Present oral, visual, or other interpretation or representation of historical understanding gained through oral history.

Part B: Learning Plan

In this inquiry students will learn about:

  • Community structure and organization and how society is organized to support them.
  • How communities support people and fill their survival needs.
  • The inter-relatedness of people to one another and their environment.

CITIZENSHIP INQUIRY

Curricular Outcomes

IN2.1 Determine the characteristics of the community.

Students will begin to understand the interdependency of people to communities and the structures that support this interdependence.

Questions are posted and discussed with students at the start of the exploration of study. These open-ended questions are continually revisited; encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study; form the evidence of understanding; and, frame the assessment at the end of the unit of study. Guiding questions are posed to support student thinking as they explore the answers to the larger overarching questions.

QUESTIONS TO GUIDE INQUIRY

Essential Questions – Guiding Questions:

  • How do needs differ from wants?
    • Do we need everything we have?
    • De we need everything we want?
    • How does meeting my needs impact myself, community, and place?
  • What responsibilities do I have to my community/fellow man?
    • What is a friend?/Who is a friend?
    • What kind of friend am I?
    • Would I choose myself as a friend?
    • What responsibility do you have to balance personal needs with community needs?
  • What responsibilities do I have to my environment?
    • What stories do my actions tell about me?
    • What is my relationship to the environment?
  • How can symbols provide a sense of belonging and unity?
    • Why are symbols so important to people? Causes? Groups? Countries?
    • What are the community symbols that are important to me and why?

Vocabulary

  • community
  • organization
  • infrastructure
  • communication
  • transportation
  • natural resources
  • industry
  • economy
  • environmental footprint
  • community stewardship

CONNECT TO TOPIC AND SURFACE STUDENTS’ THINKING ABOUT …

This section introduces the concepts and helps teachers gain an understanding of the current thinking of the class. Present essential questions and allow students to think about and talk about. Student answers will give teachers a baseline or beginning understanding of the amount of specific and incidental teaching required to explore these outcomes. Vocabulary is introduced and noted here. This section frames the “We do” portion of the lesson where teachers guide the initial structure of the inquiry.
  • Could you exist on your own without other people? Why or why not?
  • What is a community?
  • What makes a community a community? What are the characteristics of a community?
  • How do communities organize themselves so that they can begin to serve the people who live in them?
  • Can communities exist on their own? Why or why not?
  • Do communities need friends?
  • Do communities need to be looked after?

Chart student answers for later reflection.


Jigsaw Research and Study Process

Divide class into groups to find the answers to questions posed. Give each group a specific area to learn about and present to class. Each group must find out the information in the question posed below. Encourage students to present information learned in a variety of modes including speaking, writing, drama, multimedia, or other modes so that all students have an entrance point for demonstrating their learning and understanding.

DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson.  It describes the main activity(ies) involved.  In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that student make of the essential questions.  It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities.
Is the school a community?

Does the school support the community?

Identify:

  • The structures of the school that allow the school to function.
    • Who leads the school?
    • Who keeps the school community clean and physically pleasant?
    • Who supports the school?
  • The reasons for the existence of the school.
    • What needs does the school meet for students?
    • For the larger community?
    • What kinds of special events does the school community undertake?
    • What kinds of needs are those activities fulfilling?
  • Map/chart the organizational structure and activities of the school and the needs its existence fulfills for students and the larger community.

 

 

If the school is a community and supports the community then what are the characteristics of a community?

Have student groups develop answers to the questions above and give reasons for their thinking.

Begin to develop a community characteristics list.

  • How are communities organized?
    • Have students identify the various groups or communities to which students belong (e.g., cultural, recreational, faith, sports, arts).
    • Talk about the structure of the group/community i.e. who leads the group, how is it organized/structured?
    • Compare characteristics of other communities/groups to which students belong with those of the school community, identifying the similarities in meeting needs, achieving common purpose and organizational structure.
What are the similarities between the different groups to which students belong?
What are the differences?

  • Have students develop summary statements that indicate how communities are organized.
  • Have students create a concept web or map that shows how their community is supported.

APPLY AND EXTEND KNOWLEDGE

This section includes ideas to extend the inquiry and/or apply concepts explored. This section may also include additional reflective questions to promote student connection to the topic.  Reflective questions encourage critical and creative thinking.
Students will develop an understanding of communities and the organizational structures that support them. They will begin to develop an understanding of the concept of interdependence.

Communities are made of people who have developed housing/building structures and organizations to support themselves as they live together. Have students brainstorm components of community i.e.

  • People, buildings, village/town site/city divisions, services – safety, health, education, mercantile, transportation, etc.
What do people need to survive? How do communities help people survive?

What do communities need to survive? How do people help communities survive?

What responsibility do you have to look after your community?

  • Chart student answers for reflection in the following inquiry.
  • Choose a selection of communities – towns, cities, First Nations bands. Extend the scope of influence as far as students are able to understand. i.e. regionally, provincially, nationally.
  • Assign each group of students one of the communities to research. Have students:
    • Identify
      • transportation and communication networks,
      • educational and health care systems,
      • culture, sport, and recreation infrastructure
      • Tell how these networks and systems support people
    • Create a list of the different groups within the community.
      • map out their organizational (governance) structure
      • identify the symbols that represent the group, and show how the symbol connects to the group/organization
      • Identify the need the group/organization fulfills in the society or the contribution they make to the community.
    • Compare the structures or groups that support people’s needs within the community i.e. food, housing, clothing, spiritual to the list of people’s needs.
      • Are community needs being met?
      • Identify needs of the local community that cannot be met independently or individually.
      • Identify the ways that needs are supported outside of the community.
 

What were the similarities in what the students found?

What were the differences? What are the reasons for the differences?

How do communities support the survival of people/citizens of their community?

How do students support their communities?

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding. Ideally, these demonstrations will be done in authentic performance tasks. Each citizenship study may have its own smaller assessment piece or be compiled to support one larger performance task assessment. Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways.
Overarching essential understandings

  • How does my community support my needs?
  • How does meeting my needs impact myself, community, place?
  • What responsibility do you have to balance personal needs with the community’s needs?
  • How can you support your community in (What responsibility do I have to my fellow man? Community? Environment?)

Students can choose any representation method to demonstrate:

  • The interdependence within the local community.
  • The ways in which individuals and groups contribute to the well-being of the school and/or local community.

In each case students should identify the community symbols that are connected to the groups identified and tell why they are important to the student.

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES

Students are keeping a Citizenship Journal to reflect upon their developing views of citizenship.  This section provides prompts for student journals.  Students are invited to choose one that interests them or propose their own. Students can also respond to any of the essential questions.

Students are encouraged to respond using a variety of genres.

  • How can my community be made stronger?
  • How can I meet my community’s needs? What is my responsibility to support my community?
  • What kind of a community member am I?

Learning Plan

In this inquiry students will:

  • explore their connection to the community and other community members.
  • understand that they can contribute to making changes in their community and beyond with respect to environmental, social, and economic issues.

INQUIRY

Students will begin to understand the relationship between how the community serves the individual and how individuals contribute to the community by exploring the connection between the community and the environment.

Curricular Outcomes
RW2.1

  • Describe ways in which the local community meets needs and wants of its members.

Students will explore their connection to the community and other community members.
DR2.2

  • Analyze the influence of the natural environment on the local community.

Students will understand how the economic strength of the community is connected to the environment.
RW2.3

  • Contribute to initiating and guiding change in local and global communities regarding environmental, social, and economic sustainability.

Students will understand that they can contribute to making changes in their community and beyond with respect to environmental, social, and economic issues.

CONNECT TO TOPIC AND SURFACE STUDENTS’ THINKING ABOUT …

This section introduces the concepts and helps teachers gain an understanding of the current thinking of the class. Present essential questions and allow students to think about and talk about. Student answers will give teachers a baseline or beginning understanding of the amount of specific and incidental teaching required to explore these outcomes. Vocabulary is introduced and noted here. This section frames the “We do” portion of the lesson where teachers guide the initial structure of the inquiry.
What responsibility do I have to look after, support my fellow man?

  • Community?
  • Environment?

What does my behaviour say about my responsibility to my community?

  • How does meeting my needs impact myself, community, place?
  • How far reaching are the effects of my lifestyle?
  • What responsibility do you have to balance personal needs with the community’s needs?
  • Do we have the right to meet all our needs at the expense of the environment, other community’s needs?

How can I begin to make things better for my fellow man, community, and environment?

  • What responsibility do you have to balance personal needs with the community’s needs?
  • What could be an action plan to make changes?

Chart student answers. What ideas do students have about their needs and wanting to meet their needs? Are there similarities in their thinking? Examine student action plans looking for similarities and differences. Will students commit to making a difference and begin to move forward on their action plan? What supports are needed?

 

How does my community, town, band, city look after its residents? How does it support itself economically? Looking back on the previous inquiry, what were the services that people need in order to be able to live together in this community?
DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson.  It describes the main activity(ies) involved.  In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that student make of the essential questions.  It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities.
With students develop lists of the natural resources and economic development in and around the community.

How does the community/band/town/city provide for itself? Make money? How are those economic developments connected to the environment / place?

i.e. farmland, mining, businesses – gaming, entertainment, industry – manufacturing

Map those economic developments and chart for students so that they can begin to see the interconnectedness between economic development.

Divide students into groups and using the Jigsaw Research process give each student group one of the items from the list.

  • Develop a concept map showing how each of the identified economic development on the list provides employment for community members.
  • Identify natural features of the local community i.e. landforms, climate, vegetation, waterways. Have student groups show how those natural features support the assigned economic development. What is the connection between the natural feature and the economic development?
  • How would the community and the assigned economic development/jobs be affected without those natural features and natural resources?
  • How and what does the community do to conserve and/or restore natural resources?
  • Identify processes, rules, regulations, and groups of people who have responsibility for protecting the environment/resources
    • within the community,
    • outside of the community.
What is the impact of meeting your needs on self, community, and place? What is your responsibility as a citizen to protect the natural resources?

Have student groups:

  • Identify ways that technology has been and is used to enable people to adapt to the natural environment
    • building technology,
    • clothing,
    • industrial equipment,
    • personal care.
What could students do as a classroom to look after the environment?

What could students do personally to look after the environment?

What changes could they make in their lifestyle to look after the environment?

APPLY AND EXTEND KNOWLEDGE

This section includes ideas to extend the inquiry and/or apply concepts explored. This section may also include additional reflective questions to promote student connection to the topic. Reflective questions encourage critical and creative thinking.
How would we rate the environmental behaviours and choices of this class?

What does our behaviour say about the kind of Citizens connected to Self, Community, and Place that we are?

  • Students will understand the processes for making changes.
    • Identify people or groups in the community/province who are interested in supporting the sustainability of the environment.
    • Show how those individuals or groups in the communities make change and support the sustainability of the environment.
  • Students will think about how their individual consumer choices may affect people elsewhere in the world (e.g., child labour, enslavement, sweat shops, consumption of scarce resources, prosperity through employment).
    • Extend the previously developed classroom action plan to consider personal and collective action for harmonizing personal lifestyles with collective needs regarding social, environmental, and economic sustainability on a global level.
  • Give the history of a national, provincial, community symbol or ceremony and explain the symbolic nature of the symbol or ceremony.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding.  Ideal demonstrations will be in authentic performance tasks.  Each citizenship study may have its own smaller assessment piece or be compiled to support one larger performance task assessment.  Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways.
How does meeting my needs impact myself, community, place?

How far reaching are the effects of my lifestyle?

What responsibility do you have to balance personal needs with the community’s needs?

How can I begin to make things better for my fellow man, community, and environment?

What responsibility do I have to my fellow man? Community? Environment?

Have student groups choose one of the options below to demonstrate understanding.

  • Identify one example of recycling that occurs in school or community. Describe and offer alternatives or improvements.
  • Interview a member of one of community groups, identifying purpose of group, roll the group plays in community.
  • Create a commercial describing a community, regional, or global issue and offer a plausible solution.
  • Identify how they could make better choices and what the impact of those choices would be.

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES

Students are keeping a Citizenship Journal to reflect upon their developing views of citizenship. This section provides prompts for student journals. Students are invited to choose one that interests them.
  • What responsibility do I have to my fellow man?
  • What responsibility do I have to my community?
  • What responsibility do I have to my environment?
  • What kind of a “footprint” am I leaving on the environment?
  • What choices can I make now to make a positive difference in the future?

Part C: Self, Community, and Place Resources

RESOURCES

CROSS CURRICULAR CONNECTIONS

Treaty Education

  • TR2: Examine how the Treaties are the basis for harmonious relationships in which land and resources are shared.
  • HC2: Analyze the traditional forms of leadership that were in practice prior to European contact and in First Nations communities.
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Grade 2 Resources Grade 2