GRADE 3 RESOURCES

The Intentional & Direct Teaching of Essential Citizenship Competencies

GRADE 3 CITIZENSHIP STUDIES ENGAGED CITIZENS

Part A: Curricular Connections and Background

BROAD AREA OF CITIZENSHIP

Engaged Citizens question, critically examine, advocate, and defend rights and responsibilities of a democracy on multiple levels. They work to understand the issues, overt and hidden within citizenship challenges and develop appropriate action plans to address those issues. They are also extending their understanding of the benefits and richness that diversity and multiculturalism bring to Canadians.
Engaged citizens strive to understand issues from a variety of viewpoints. Students will begin to explore processes of dispute resolution and examine and practice actions that contribute to peace and order. Critical thinking exploration in this area of citizenship encourages students to try to understand a point of view that is different from their own.

OVERVIEW AND DESIRED RESULTS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Grade 3 students continue their study of actions and practices that contribute to peace and order. Students investigate the responsibilities of varying levels of government and the scope of influence of their decisions. Students extend their use of maps and globes to represent the Earth and consider why people choose to live and settle where they do. Students begin to learn about the relationship between beliefs, rights, and responsibilities. They explore how history can impact present events and further examine how different points of view can lead to different interpretations of the same event. Students consider the impact of culture and diversity on interpretation of current events. Students strive to:

  • understand and value the historical and contemporary diversity in groups;
  • explore the relationships between beliefs, rights, and responsibilities at a school, community, and national level; and,
  • understand the different types of governance and their responsibilities at the local and national levels.

CURRICULUM OUTCOMES AND INDICATORS

Rules, regulations, and laws are the primary means by which society organizes and brings structure to itself. Students consider the relationship between rights and responsibilities that bring order to society. As students examine the effects of rules and begin to appreciate the responsibilities of the governing body that developed those rules/structures, students are learning of the responsibility that citizens have to support and contribute to varying levels of governance.

Students think about the varying impacts that rules have on people and as students strive to understand that, they also work to understand the underlying purpose behind the rule.

  • Enduring understandings are the big ideas that stimulate thinking, guide the inquiry and are linked to outcomes.
  • Essential questions point to the “big ideas’ in the inquiry and should be considered and reconsidered as the inquiry progresses.
  • Answers to these questions form the evidence of learning at the end of study.
Students will use information to understand that:

  • Decision-making is a complex process with far-reaching impacts and is influenced by history. A person’s worldview frames their understanding of the world.
  • Citizens value the need of the collective common good and consider how their actions impact the collective well-being.
  • Governments and the people who elect them are responsible to one another.
  • Empathy and respect for diversity in cultural and social groups help strengthen one’s community and requires appreciation of different perspectives.
  • Individuals have the power to affect others and make a difference.
  • Canada has a long relationship with First Nations Peoples through treaty relationships.
  • Societies create rules, written and unwritten, to promote order that lead to inclusion or exclusion and are enforced by social behaviours and expectations.
  • Belonging requires participation and is a fundamental right of all citizens. Active citizens become engaged in discussions, negotiations, debates and consider action regarding Canadian issues.

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT

Students will be able to:

  • Determine the governing body and the rules/laws they develop so they can think about fairness, and consider how to advocate effectively to support or change the rules/laws.
  • Determine the impact of rules on diverse groups that live in Canada.
  • Determine the sphere of influence of rules that govern behavior of the province of Saskatchewan.
  • Determine a process for advocacy. Understand that the perceived fairness of rules on diverse groups that live in Canada may be influenced by point of view.
  • Advocate effectively to support or change rules to promote social order.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

  • How do people who live together organize themselves?
  • How much do rules matter?
  • Who monitors the rule makers?
  • How much power should leaders have?
  • To whom are rule makers responsible?
  • Why are treaty relationships important to all Canadians?
  • What is another point of view of this (any) matter?
Essential Questions are open-ended questions that are continually revisited, encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study, form the evidence of understanding and frame the assessment at the end of the study.

CURRICULUM OUTCOMES AND INDICATORS

Outcomes: Student Friendly Outcomes
PA3.2
Demonstrate awareness that different points of view may lead to better understandings and acceptance that people can believe different things and still live peacefully together.
Indicators:

  • Inventory situations in which divergent viewpoints exist within the classroom and school.
  • Solicit the opinion of several persons about a current issue of concern in the school.
  • Categorize viewpoints as likely or unlikely to create conflict and explain why.
  • Construct a list of reasons why groups and communities may experience conflict, and identify ways in which conflict is resolved and harmony is restored.
  • Respond to the following question: “Why might people be in favour or against a particular project or issues (e.g., fear that it might cost too much or that it might be too much work, one’s own idea was rejected, desire to contribute to the community, desire to beautify the community)”.
  • Paraphrase orally and in writing a favourable opinion and an unfavorable opinion about an issue of concern in a community studied.
  • Stimulate one or more conflict resolution models as a means of resolving an issue in the school or community.
  • Research different laws and rules in communities studied, and speculate upon the reasons for such laws and rules.

PA 3.3
Make generalizations about the purpose and intent of documents that define the rights of children.
Indicators:

  • Research the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of the Child and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and suggest reasons for these declarations.
  • Research the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and child protection legislation in Saskatchewan.
  • Compare the rights and protections for children in Saskatchewan to those in international communities studied.
  • Compare how the rights, responsibilities, and roles of citizens in international communities studied are the same or different than those of Canadian citizens.

IN3.1
Analyze daily life in a diversity of communities.
Indicators:

  • Describe characteristics of daily life in communities studied, and compare the ways in which the needs are met by individuals in diverse communities (e.g., housing, tools, work, use of the land, games, education).
  • Give examples of how culture is reflected in daily life in various communities, and examine why these cultural elements are important (e.g., language, stories, cultural traditions, religions traditions, recreations, art, architecture, clothing).
  • Compare life of a child in the local community to life of a child in one of the communities studied (e.g. family, housing, education, recreation.

IN3.2
Analyze the cultures and traditions in communities studied.
Indicators:

  • Hypothesize about the interactions students may have with people and communities elsewhere in the world.
  • Give examples of traditions and practices that have endured over time in communities studied, and discuss why these are important.
  • Make inferences about how the culture of the local community is reflected by its customs and celebrations.

Overarching Outcome
DR3.1
Use various model representations of the Earth.
Indicators:

  • Demonstrate understanding that the surface of the Earth can be represented through maps, aerial photographs, and satellite images.
  • Identify geographic concepts including continents, countries, borders, hemispheres, and the equator.
  • Locate and identify the continents and oceans on a map or globe.
  • Locate and identify countries or regions studied on a map or globe.

DR 3.2
Assess the degree to which the geography and related environmental and climatic factors influence ways of living on and with the land.
Indicators:

  • Identify the influences that geography has on societies (e.g., location of settlements, transportation of goods and people, types of industry such as farming, ranching, forestry, mining, tourism, and manufacturing).
  • Recognized how environmental and climatic factors are influenced by location (e.g., proximity to water bodies influences precipitation and temperature; mountainous terrain influences soil formation, precipitation, and temperature).

Part B: Learning Plan

In this inquiry students will:

  • Learn that people can live peacefully together and still hold different points of view.
  • Learn that points of view are influenced by past experiences which if explored might lead to greater acceptance of an alternate opinion.
  • Understand the intent and purpose of human rights documents for children.

CITIZENSHIP INQUIRY

Curricular Outcomes (Student friendly outcomes)

Demonstrate awareness that different points of view may lead to better understandings and acceptance that people can believe different things and still live peacefully together. (PA3.2)

Students will recognize that situations have different points of view and taking the time to explore those viewpoints can lead to greater understanding.

Make generalizations about the purpose and intent of documents that define the rights of children. (PA 3.3)

Students will understand the intent and purpose of human rights documents for children.

QUESTIONS TO GUIDE INQUIRY

Essential Questions: Guiding Questions

  • What is another point of view on this situation? /How might someone else view the situation?
    • What is influencing that point of view?
    • Can two points of view be different and still accurate?
  • What is cultural diversity and why is it important?
    • How does affirmation (celebration) of diversity strengthen Canada?
    • What can I learn from different cultures?
    • How does cultural diversity affect opinion?
  • Why are treaty relationships important to all Canadians?
    • How do treaty obligations impact Canadians?
    • What are your treaty obligations/responsibilities?
    • What are your community’s treaty responsibilities?
    • Why are treaty obligations so difficult to fulfill?
    • How would you rate the manner in which treaty obligations have been met?
  • How much do rules matter? / Why do we need rules?
    • How do rules support society?
    • If rules impact people differently are they fair?
  • How much power should leaders have? / Who watches/monitors the rule makers?
    • What should leaders consider when making rules?

Vocabulary

  • point of view
  • advocate
  • diversity
  • opinion
  • culture
  • environment
  • paraphrase

CONNECT TO TOPIC AND SURFACE STUDENTS’ THINKING ABOUT …

This section introduces the concepts and helps teachers gain an understanding of the current thinking of the class.  Present essential questions and allow students to think about and talk about.  Student answers will give teachers a baseline or beginning understanding of the amount of specific and incidental teaching required to explore these outcomes. Vocabulary is introduced and noted here.  This section frames the “We do” portion of the lesson where teachers guide the initial structure of the inquiry.
Process

  • Pose the essential and guiding questions and allow students to discuss their thoughts on the matter.
  • Determine what the students know, understand, need to be able to do to master/answer the essential questions (connect to content). Additional guiding questions can be added as required.  Students are encouraged to add their questions to the others.
  • Create Know, Want to know, Learned Chart – identify vocabulary that requires development
  • Surface any additional questions students might have as a result of their discussions about the essential questions.
  • Post student answers for reflection at end of study.
Understanding “opinions”

  • What is an opinion?
  • Why do people have different opinions?
  • What influences opinions?
  • Discuss questions with students to surface their thinking.

Voting with your Feet Activity

This activity has students responding to statements by placing themselves along a continuum or line in the classroom similar to a Lichert scale response. At one end of the line is ‘like or agree’ and at the other end is ‘don’t like or disagree’.

Like/agree ..….…Don’t know/care……….Don’t like/disagree

Give students statements and have them stand at a place on the line that demonstrates their opinion about things.

What do students think about:

  • Specific foods, tv shows, movies, activities, school subjects, etc. Choose topics that will engender different points of view but does not have any strong emotional connections.
  • Give students time to move to the space on the line that shows how they feel about the item mentioned. Quiz students at different spots on the continuum asking them:
    • Why they feel that way?
    • What experience they have with the topic?
    • How their families might feel about the topic
    • Did any students go to the spot because their friends were there?
  • Move to issues that evoke more emotion
    • Introduce a topic with the words – Which is better? i.e. cats or dogs, one sports team/sport over another? Having cell phones, etc.
  • Identify some of the themes that are emerging and post for reflection.
  • Explore the emotional connection to different points of view. Note level of emotion in room and surface feelings about student choice.
    • Survey the students, collect and track different opinions. Surface feelings about whether others agreed with their opinions of items surveyed above.
    • Compare to previous situation. Students should understand that when a different point of view is seen as right or wrong or better or worse, the choice becomes more emotional because it may be seen as a reflection of the person i.e. better or worse, right or wrong.
DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson.  It describes the main activity(ies) involved.  In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that student make of the essential questions.  It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities. This forms the “We do” “They do” section of the inquiry where students are finding answers to the overarching questions and then searching for themes and patterns as possible explanations.
Students are developing an appreciation for another point of view and developing a strategy for understanding a different viewpoint.

Read or watch the Three Little Pigs Story from the Wolf’s Perspective. Talk about the differences in perspective.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m75aEhm-BYw

  • What do students do when confronted with a difference of opinion or point of view?
  • What do students do to try to understand another point of view?
    • Do students have an identified strategy for listening?
    • Do they have some self-talk strategy that they may have learned in health?
    • Do students know how to paraphrase?

Post strategies for referral.

  • Explore strategies for examining different points of view.
    • Reflect on the situations in which different viewpoints exist within the classroom and school. Track and chart the different points of view.
    • Ask students to explain their thinking about their particular point of view. Have students note:
      • What is their emotional response to the point of view? Like/dislike- agree/disagree- understand/don’t understand – How is this emotion/response impacting my understanding of the point of view?
      • What clarifying questions do students have about the point of view that will help their understanding?
        • What don’t I understand?
        • What additional information do I need?
        • Why might the other person feel this way?
        • What was the reason for the other person’s opinion? Does this make sense to me? Does it sound logical?
        • What personal biases do I have about this?
        • What am I taking for granted/assuming?
    • Have the student try to paraphrase the person’s point of view. This will help to point out the difficulties in understanding.
  • Solicit the opinion of several persons about a current issue of concern in the school. Chart the responses and then work through the questions below to try to understand the point of view.
    • Determine your emotional response to decide if that is impacting your understanding of the viewpoint.
    • Is student understanding of the point of view clear? Try to paraphrase.
    • What additional information is needed?
    • Why might this person feel this way?
    • Does this person’s thinking make sense to the student?
    • What are the consequences of this point of view?
  • Identify issues or situations in which groups and communities may experience conflict.
  • Research and identify ways in which conflict might be resolved and harmony restored. Students will need to practice thinking from another point of view using skills of empathy and logical reasoning. Have students identify their thinking processes aloud so that they are aware of their thinking and that other students also become aware of different ways to approach situations.
    i.e. “Why might people be in favour or against a particular project or issue (e.g., fear that it might cost too much or that it might be too much work, one’s own idea was rejected, desire to contribute to the community, desire to beautify the community)”.
  • Paraphrase orally and in writing a favourable opinion and an unfavourable opinion about an issue of concern in a community studied.
  • Present students with statements that will generate alternate points of view.
    i.e. School days should be longer. Fighting should be banned from hockey.
  • Have students develop clarifying questions that will help to identify the issue and develop alternate points of view on the topic.

APPLY AND EXTEND KNOWLEDGE

This section includes ideas to extend the inquiry or apply concepts explored. This section may also include additional reflective questions to promote student connection to the topic.  This forms the “You do” section of the inquiry – may be “you do it collaboratively” or “you do it alone”.   Invite students to extend their thinking beyond the classroom discussions and inquiry experiences.  Pose additional reflective questions that have been raised to encourage critical and creative thinking.  
Revisit the essential questions around Treaty Obligations. Explore these questions based on the new learning about different points of view and opinion.

Why are treaty relationships important to all Canadians?

  • How do treaty obligations impact Canadians?
  • What are your treaty obligations/responsibilities?
  • What are your community’s treaty responsibilities?
  • Why are treaty obligations so difficult to fulfill?
  • How would you rate the manner in which treaty obligations have been met?

 

Do all people feel the same way about the way treaty obligations have been handled? Why might there be a difference of opinion?

Learning Plan

Students will understand how rules and regulations protect people.
Students are asked to research international communities in this inquiry. When deciding which communities to research, consider selecting countries which reflect classroom, school, or community demographics so that students have a more relevant perspective.
Resident Experts – invite immigrants to community to talk with students about some of the reasons why they came to Canada.

CITIZENSHIP INQUIRY STUDY 2

QUESTIONS TO GUIDE INQUIRY

Essential Questions: Guiding Questions

  • Why do we need rules?
    • How much do rules matter?
    • Could we live without rules?
  • How do rules support us?
    • Where do you have to follow rules?
  • Could there ever be a place/situation where rules are not followed? What happens then?

Post student answers for later reflection.

  • What are human rights?
  • Why are they important?
  • Why might we need rules to protect human rights?

Post student answers for later reflection.

Investigate with students the:

  • The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
  • The United Nations Declaration of the Rights of the Child.

For each of the documents identified above have students indicate:

  • Who the document is talking about/directed toward?
  • What rights or issues are addressed?
  • Tell how the document protects the rights of the individual.
  • Tell why the document is important and needed.
Jig Saw Study Process

Divide class into groups and give each group a specific area to learn about and present to the class. Each group must find out the information in the questions posed. Encourage students to present information learned, in a variety of modes including verbal and visual modes so that all students have an entrance point into the presentation and discussion.

This activity should be done in groups so that students can share their ideas and their thinking.

  • Why are rules to protect the rights of the individual important?
  • Why are they needed? / What would happen without rules and regulations for Human Rights?
  • Compare the rights and protections for children in Saskatchewan to those in selected international communities.
  • Compare how the rights, responsibilities, and roles of citizens in selected international communities are the same or different than those of Canadian citizens. Students should:
    • Chart their answers using Venn diagrams to identify similarities and differences.
    • Rate the importance of Human Rights Legislations 1 – not important, 5 – important.
    • As a class, discuss the differing points of view regarding the importance of such legislation. Why do these differences occur? What is impacting student thinking?

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding.  Ideal demonstrations will be in authentic performance tasks.  Each citizenship study may have its own smaller assessment piece or be compiled to support one larger performance task assessment.  Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways.  Demonstrations of understanding may be done collaboratively or independently.
  • Choose a classroom or school issue or problem, outline two different points of view and identify the thinking that might represent the different points of view. Identify the patterns of thought used to determine the different points of view.
  • Describe how needs are met and the life of a child in the local community to the life of a child in a community studied. Identify the similarities and differences and give reasons for the differences.

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES

Students are keeping a Citizenship Journal to reflect upon their developing views of citizenship.  This section provides prompts for student journals.  Students are invited to choose one that interests them or propose their own. Students can also respond to any of the essential questions.

Students are encouraged to respond using a variety of genres.

  • How is your life protected because you were born in Canada?
  • What is the most important thing for you to consider when trying to understand another point of view?
  • Think of a time when someone had a different point of view from yours? How did this make you feel? Could you come to an agreement on your thinking?
  • What should leaders consider when making rules?

Learning Plan

In this inquiry students will:

  • Determine the governing body that developed rules so they can determine fairness, sphere of influence, and advocate effectively to support or change the rules
  • Understand that the perceived fairness of rules on diverse groups that live in Canada may be influenced by point of view.
  • Determine the sphere of influence of rules that govern behaviour of Canadians
  • Advocate effectively to support or change rules to promote social order

CITIZENSHIP INQUIRY 3

Curricular Outcomes (Student friendly outcomes)

IN3.1 – Analyze daily life in a diversity of communities.

Students will be able to identify similarities and differences in communities very different from their own.

IN3.2 – Analyze the cultures and traditions in communities studied.

Students will understand how cultural traditions support communities over time.

QUESTIONS TO GUIDE INQUIRY

Essential Questions: Guiding Questions

  • What is cultural diversity and why is it important? / How does affirmation of diversity strengthen Canada?
    • What can I learn from different cultures?
    • What is another point of view on this situation? / How might someone else view the situation?
  • Why are treaty relationships important to all Canadians?
    • What treaty area do we live in?
    • What are our treaty responsibilities?
    • How do we fulfill those responsibilities?
  • How much do rules matter? / Why do we need rules?
    • How do rules support society?
  • How much power should leaders have? / Who monitors the rule makers?
    • What should leaders consider when making rules?

CONNECT TO TOPIC AND SURFACE STUDENTS’ THINKING ABOUT …

This section introduces the concepts and helps teachers gain an understanding of the current thinking of the class.  Present essential questions and allow students to think about and talk about.  Student answers will give teachers a baseline or beginning understanding of the amount of specific and incidental teaching required to explore these outcomes. Vocabulary is introduced and noted here.  This section frames the “We do” portion of the lesson where teachers guide the initial structure of the inquiry.
Process

  • Pose the essential and guiding questions and allow students to discuss their thoughts on the matter.
  • Determine what the students know, understand, need to be able to do to master/answer the essential questions (connect to content). Additional guiding questions can be added as required. Students are encouraged to add their questions to the others.
  • Create Know, Want to know, Learned Chart – identify vocabulary that requires development
  • Surface any additional questions students might have as a result of their discussions about the essential questions.
  • Post student answers for reflection at end of study.
  • Determine what the students know, understand, need to be able to do to master/answer the essential questions
    • How do communities work to meet your needs? i.e. housing, tools, work, use of the land, games, education).
    • Do communities structure themselves in similar manners? Have students determine yes or no and give reasons for their thinking.
    • Why and how do cultural traditions continue?
  • Create Know, Want to Know, Learned chart to track learning throughout citizenship study.
    • Surface questions that students have.
    • Identify vocabulary understandings that must be developed
DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson.  It describes the main activity(ies) involved.  In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that student make of the essential questions.  It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities.
Students will develop understanding that communities structure themselves in similar manners while still respecting specific cultures.

  • In groups have students study three communities unfamiliar to them. At least one community should be a First Nations reserve community within their treaty area.
  • Students will examine the following areas: meeting daily needs, how culture is reflected and enduring traditions or practices.
  • Students will:
  • Describe characteristics of daily life in communities studied.
  • Compare the ways in which the needs are met by individuals in diverse communities (e.g., housing, tools, work, use of the land, games, education).
  • Identify how the culture is reflected throughout community practices and structures (e.g., decision making, holidays, community events, language, stories, cultural traditions, religious traditions, recreation, art, architecture, clothing).
  • Identify similarities and differences between their life and the life of a student of comparable age focusing specifically on family, housing, education, and recreation.
  • When researching First Nations communities try to have the research be as authentic as possible by arranging classroom visits by elders and community leaders and having students visit First Nations community to meet with elders and community leaders.

APPLY AND EXTEND KNOWLEDGE

This section includes ideas to extend student thinking and apply concepts explored. This section may also include additional reflective questions to promote student connection to the topic.  Reflective questions encourage critical and creative thinking.
Students will understand the responsibilities for provision of daily needs included in Treaty Relationships.

“Treaties were foundational agreements entered into for the purposes of providing the parties with the means to achieve survival and stability, anchored on the principle of mutual benefit.”

Source: “Some Common Understandings from the Treaty Table”

http://www.sfsin.com/treatygovernance/treatytable.html

Teaching Treaties in the Classroom: A Treaty Resource Guide for Grade 3 pg. 34

  • Have students identify what the quote means from the perspective of The Crown and First Nations’ people. Surface similarities and differences.
  • In the study of how communities provide for individuals needs compare how needs are met in First Nations communities on reserve and off-reserve.
    • Hypothesize about the interactions students may have with people and communities elsewhere in the world.
    • Give examples of traditions and practices that have endured over time in First Nations’ communities and discuss why these are important.
    • Make inferences about how the culture of the First Nation’s community is reflected by its customs and celebrations.
    • How does the ability of First Nations’ communities to respond to the needs of their community members compare with other communities studied?
    • Talk about how/the degree to which Treaty Responsibilities have been honoured from the perspective of First Nations people and non-First Nations people.
    • Hypothesize about why the differences might have occurred.
    • Students should give evidence and support for their opinion.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding.  Ideal demonstrations will be in authentic performance tasks.  Each citizenship study may have its own smaller assessment piece or be compiled to support one larger performance task assessment.  Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways.
Reflect on earlier thinking surfaced in discussion of the essential questions at the beginning of the inquiry.

  • How has student thinking changed?
  • Why is it important to learn this information?
  • What will students do with this learning?

Give examples of how culture is reflected in daily life and how traditional practices have endured in communities studied, and examine why these cultural elements are important

Respond to one of the journal prompts on the following pages.

Informal Demonstrations of Understanding

  • Participate in a celebration of cultures where they celebrate particular aspects of cultures (i.e. Dance, food, music, fashion, games…)
  • Note the ability of students to take another person’s perspective in informal problem solving in classroom activities.

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES

Students are keeping a Citizenship Journal to reflect upon their developing views of citizenship. This section provides prompts for student journals. Students are invited to choose one that interests them or propose their own. Students can also respond to any of the essential questions. Students are encouraged to respond using a variety of genres.
  • Why are treaty relationships important to all Canadians? In your opinion how well has Canada honored treaty responsibilities? Why do you think this is so? Give evidence to support your thinking.
  • What did you learn about a culture different from yours that you did not know before?
  • Why does the world need a Declaration of Human Rights for children?
  • What did you learn about human rights for children that surprised you?
  • How well does Canada honour and protect human rights for children? Give examples to support your thinking.

Part C: Engaged Citizens Resources

RESOURCES

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

The United Nations Declaration of the Rights of the Child

CROSS CURRICULAR CONNECTIONS

Language Arts
Themes

  • Personal and Philosophical: Students will:
    • believe in their own self-worth and feel that they have control over the things that happen to them;
    • look inward and focus on self-image and self-esteem; and,
    • reflect on self and life, and on their beliefs and values and those of their society.
  • Social, Cultural, and Historical: Students will:
    • look outward and examine their relationships with others, their community, and the world;
    • consider the social and historical context;
    • explore their connections in families, schools, groups, and communities to understand the diverse needs and wants of others; and,
    • show concern for other people in their relationships, groups, and communities.
  • Communicative: Students will:
    • consider the role of communication in their lives and the technologies and strategies that help people become effective communicators; and,
    • practice the skills to interact effectively with others.

Treaty Education

  • SI3: Examine how various teachings people have about the natural world guide behaviour and actions.
  • HC3: Explore the benefits that each of the parties to treaty enjoy.
  • TPP3: Explore how the use of different languages in treaty making presented challenges and how those challenges impact people today.

Health

Understanding, Skills, and Confidences (USC)

  • USC3.4 Understand what it means to contribute to the health of self, family and home.
  • USC3.5 Evaluate safe behaviours/practices to increase the safety of self and others while at home.

GRADE 3 CITIZENSHIP STUDIES LIFELONG LEARNING CITIZENS

Part A: Curricular Connections and Background

BROAD AREA OF CITIZENSHIP

Lifelong Learning Citizens understand the dynamics of change, seek information about issues and acquire skills for action. In this area of citizenship study, students develop skills, attitudes, and knowledge to assist them in understanding change. Students learn to appreciate the need for on-going learning regardless of one’s age. The world is continually changing and students must continually adopt an inquisitive attitude to the changes and the impact change has on the individual, homes, schools, and the community.
Students are asked to understand and be aware of their thinking and the ways in which they make meaning of information explored. It is through ongoing examination and reflection of the processes of critical thinking that understanding of citizenship issues and transferring understandings to new but similar situations will occur.

DESIRED RESULTS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Students will begin to examine the process of decision-making and problem solving. How do past events influence present thoughts and decisions? How is a person’s worldview developed? How does that point of view impact present decisions, future decisions? How does one reach a decision to act in one way rather than another?

Grade 3 students will continue to examine how different points of view cause people to think differently about the same subject and come to different conclusions about how to act. They will begin to develop a process for examining worldviews to better identify the impact of past influences on current decisions. Students will develop a variety of processes for solving problems. Awareness of their thinking and the way students examine challenges is critical to understanding citizenship issues. Citizenship issues do not remain in the school but exist in real-life situations outside of the classroom. Lifelong learning is dependent on transferring the learning to the student’s world.

Students will:

  • Understand the ripple effect of decision-making
  • Use historical events to guide current and future decision-making

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

The processes for solving problems will be explored with emphasis on understanding the thinking behind the decision. Developing an awareness of the thinking behind a decision will help students determine the soundness of the decision. Teachers are encouraged to review the critical and creative thinking outcomes so that opportunities for students to understand and reflect on their thinking processes are provided.
  • Enduring understandings are the big ideas that stimulate thinking, guide the inquiry and are linked to outcomes.
  • Essential questions point to the “big ideas’ in the inquiry and should be considered and reconsidered as the inquiry progresses.
  • Answers to these questions form the evidence of learning at the end of study.
Students extend their use of maps and globes to represent the Earth and consider why people choose to live and settle where they do.

Students will use information to understand that:

  • Decision-making is a complex process with far-reaching impacts and is influenced by history.
  • A person’s worldview frames their understanding of the world.
  • Citizens value the need of the collective common good and consider how their actions impact the collective well-being.
  • Governments and the people who elect them are responsible to one another.
  • Empathy and respect for diversity in cultural and social groups help strengthen one’s community and requires appreciation of different perspectives.
  • Individuals have the power to affect others and make a difference.
  • Canada has a long relationship with First Nations Peoples through treaty relationships.
  • Societies create rules, written and unwritten, to promote order that lead to inclusion or exclusion and are enforced by social behaviours and expectations.
  • Belonging requires participation and is a fundamental right of all citizens.
  • Active citizens become engaged in discussions, negotiations, debates and consider action regarding Canadian issues.

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT

Students will know:

  • The significance of historical events and use this knowledge to guide current and future decision making
  • How to examine a worldview
  • How to use a model to solve problems

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

Essential Questions are open-ended questions that are continually revisited, encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study, form the evidence of understanding and frame the assessment at the end of the study.
  • What influences your decisions?
  • How far reaching are the impacts of decisions? (ie. Community, province, nation, world, universe)
  • Can all problems be solved the same way? What steps (model) do you use in order to solve a problem?
  • Do all problems have a solution?
  • How does history influence current decisions?

CURRICULUM OUTCOMES AND INDICATORS

Outcomes: Student Friendly Outcomes
PA3.1
Compare how decisions are made in the local community and communities studied.
Indicators:

  • Identify formal and informal types of leadership.
  • Construct an inventory of examples of positive leadership in school groups and communities.
  • Give examples of ways in which groups and communities make decisions.
  • Investigate decision-making processes in communities studied.
  • Identify examples of decision-making structures where leadership is:
    • Inherited
    • Elected
    • Communal

RW3.1
Appraise the ways communities meet their members’ needs and wants.
Indicators:

  • Speculate upon various challenges faced by communities in meeting needs and wants, with evidence gathered from examining pictures, viewing media, and interpreting stories using a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts.
  • Identify how individuals and communities meet needs and wants.
  • Describe ways in which communities help ensure basic human needs are met (e.g., food and water, shelter, clothing, education, safety).
  • Describe how and why communities exchange goods with other communities.
  • Demonstrate awareness that there are global organizations that support communities (e.g., United Nations, UNICEF, Doctors Without Borders).
  • Describe the impact of environmental factors and events on ways of life in communities studied (e.g., climate, vegetation, natural resources, landforms, floods, droughts, storms).

Overarching Outcome
DR3.1
Use various model representations of the Earth.
Indicators:

  • Demonstrate understanding that the surface of the Earth can be represented through maps, aerial photographs, and satellite images.
  • Identify geographic concepts including continents, countries, borders, hemispheres, and the equator.
  • Locate and identify the continents and oceans on a map or globe.
  • Locate and identify countries or regions studied on a map or globe.

DR 3.2
Assess the degree to which the geography and related environmental and climatic factors influence ways of living on and with the land.
Indicators:

  • Identify the influences that geography has on societies (e.g., location of settlements, transportation of goods and people, types of industry such as farming, ranching, forestry, mining, tourism, and manufacturing).
  • Recognized how environmental and climatic factors are influenced by location (e.g., proximity to water bodies influences precipitation and temperature; mountainous terrain influences soil formation, precipitation, and temperature).

Part B: Learning Plan

In this inquiry students will:

  • Look at decision-making processes in the community and consider:
  • Influences on decisions
  • The impact of those decisions.
  • The effectiveness of those decisions.
  • Consider how the environment and land geography affects our choices.

CURRICULAR CONNECTIONS

Students will:

  • Compare how decisions are made in the local community and communities studied. (PA3.1)

Students will look at the decision-making processes in the community and consider the impact of decisions.

  • Appraise the ways communities meet their members’ needs and wants. (RW3.1)

Students will consider the effectiveness of communities in meeting people’s needs and wants.

QUESTIONS TO GUIDE INQUIRY

Essential questions are posted and discussed with students at the start of the exploration of study. These open-ended questions are continually revisited; encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study; form the evidence of understanding; and, frame the assessment at the end of the unit of study. Guiding questions are posed to support student thinking as they explore the answers to the larger overarching questions.
Teachers may want to consider putting the questions into a “Before, During, After” chart to note the changes in students’ thinking as a result of the inquiries.
Essential Questions: Guiding Questions

  • What influences your decisions?
    • What do you think about when you make a decision?
    • How does your worldview / what you believe impact your decisions?
    • What does your community government think about when they make decisions?
  • How does history influence your decisions?
    • What impact does history or the past have on your decisions?
    • What impact does history have on current community government decisions?
    • What does “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it” (George Santayana) mean to you?
  • How far reaching are the impacts of decisions? (i.e., Community, province, nation, world, universe)
    • Who is affected by your decisions?
    • Who is affected by your community government decisions?
  • Can all problems be solved the same way?
    • What steps do you use in order to solve a problem?
    • How do community governments solve problems?
  • Do all problems have a solution?

Vocabulary
Worldview

  • complex system of ideas a person learns over their lifetime and never really completely
  • a person’s worldview are reflected in the way that they act, the choices they make and the stories they tell
  • a people’s worldview is at the very heart of their culture because it gives order and meaning to life

Government

  • political authority or control granted to a structure or organization that makes decisions on behalf of a group of people
  • supervision, authority or command
  • management, rule, administration

Leadership

  • ability to lead, guide
  • make decisions, chose a direction that others follow or on someone’s behalf

Kinds of Leadership
Formal Leadership

  • leadership that is given because of a position in a group i.e. teacher in a classroom, older sibling, chief of a First Nation, mayor

Informal Leadership

  • leadership that is has not been officially determined but leadership that is given to the person by the members in the group

Inherited

  • receive something from your family or relative
  • Inherited leadership is leadership that was gained through a family member or previous position without consultation with the group.

Elected

  • Chosen by a majority group of people
  • Elected Leadership is leadership that was gained because the majority of people have chosen this person to lead them.

Communal

  • shared amongst a group of people
  • Communal Leadership is leadership that is shared amongst a group of people with common concerns. It can be determined formally or informally.

CONNECT TO TOPIC AND SURFACE STUDENTS’ THINKING ABOUT …

This section introduces the concepts and helps teachers gain an understanding of the current thinking of the class.  Present essential questions and allow students to think about and talk about.  Student answers will give teachers a baseline or beginning understanding of the amount of specific and incidental teaching required to explore these outcomes. Vocabulary is introduced and noted here.  This section frames the “We do” portion of the lesson where teachers guide the initial structure of the inquiry.
Process

  • Pose the essential and guiding questions and allow students to discuss their thoughts on the matter.
  • Determine what the students know, understand, need to be able to do to master/answer the essential questions (connect to content). Additional guiding questions can be added as required. Students are encouraged to add their questions to the others.
  • Create Know, Want to know, Learned Chart – identify vocabulary that requires development
  • Surface any additional questions students might have as a result of their discussions about the essential questions.
  • Post student answers for reflection at end of study.
Students will look at the decision-making processes in the community and consider the impact of decisions.

Decision making: Easy or Hard?

Why are some decisions easy to make and others more difficult?

Think about a recent decision you made that was easy. What was it and what made it easy?

Think about a recent decision that was hard. What was it and what made it hard?

  • What influences your decisions?
    • What do you think about when you make a decision?
    • What do your caregivers/parents think about?
    • What do teachers, peace keepers, health care workers, others? Think about?
    • What do your community leaders/government think about when they make decisions?

In your group develop some guidelines for decision-making. Post group answers, look for similarities, differences. Develop a classroom consensus on the guidelines.

DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson.  It describes the main activity(ies) involved.  In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that student make of the essential questions.  It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities. This forms the “We do” “They do” section of the inquiry where students are finding answers to the overarching questions and then searching for themes and patterns as possible explanations
This will require direct teaching. Have students note similarities and differences.
Students will develop understanding of how decisions are made in different arenas and the scope of influence/impact of decisions.

Choose a decision and then trace the scope of influence/impact. Chart using chain reaction graphic organizer (see appendix). Identify who makes the decisions and the scope of influence/impact of the decision.

  • Family – caregivers, parents, grandparents, older siblings – impacts family members
  • Classroom – teacher, student – impacts students, caregivers, parents, teachers
  • School – principal, teachers, caregivers, parents – impacts students, caregivers, parents, teachers, principal
  • Community leaders – chief, mayor, counselors, – impacts …

What does the decision tell you about the goal/outcome the decision makers were trying to achieve?

With each example have students talk about:

  • Kinds of decisions made
  • How decisions are made
  • What might have influenced the decision
  • Who is impacted by the decision (sphere of influence)
  • How the result of that decision might be perceived by others. Reinforce earlier discussions about point of view affecting perceptions.
  • Process for changing the decision

Students will develop an understanding of different kinds of leadership.

Brainstorm with students the different kinds of leaders in their lives. Chart those identified leaders.

  • Using the jigsaw study process have groups of students research the following kinds of leadership.
    • inherited leadership
    • elected leadership
    • communal leadership
    • formal leadership
    • informal leadership
  • Have students apply their learning of the different kinds of leadership by categorizing the identified leaders into a specific category of leadership.
  • Have students construct an inventory of examples of leadership in school groups and communities.

Students will practice using decision-making models

  • If schools are using a specific decision-making model, it should be examined here.
    • Teach and model different forms of decision-making models.
    • Health decision making model
      – Stop – Think – Do from Sask. Curriculum

Stop Light Graphic

  • The red light indicates that students and teachers should STOP to wonder about knowledge within and beyond the classroom. This involves asking compelling questions, reflecting on what is known, and imagining how things might be different. People should also stop to think about how they are feeling about the situation and if they are angry or upset, use deep breathing or counting to ten to calm themselves down before moving forward.
  • The yellow light suggests that students and teachers THINK deeply about what they are seeing, hearing, and feeling. This involves gathering knowledge from a wide range of sources for the purpose of comparing ideas, making connections, and shaping new thoughts. Is there something that the person can change about the situation? Is there something that the person could differently? Do they have enough information to make a decision or move forward?
  • The green light represents the ‘doing’ part of learning. Students DO by making choices or forming an opinion or making a decision based on what they know and understand. How is the individual going to move forward? What is the impact of moving forward?
  • Students will apply what they have learned about decision-making, leadership and governance to consider the processes and impacts of decision-making by community governments. (Connecting to overarching or essential questions)
    • Have mayor, chief, counsel members visit classroom to share with students their answers to the following questions in an interview format.
    • Have an elder visit the classroom to talk about First Nations connection to the past and the value of connecting to the past as they move to the future.
    • Present Stop, Think, Do model and ask them to “talk through” their problem solving process.

APPLY AND EXTEND KNOWLEDGE

This section includes ideas to extend the inquiry or apply concepts explored. This section may also include additional reflective questions to promote student connection to the topic.  This forms the “You do” section of the inquiry – may be “you do it collaboratively” or “you do it alone”.   Invite students to extend their thinking beyond the classroom discussions and inquiry experiences.  Pose additional reflective questions that have been raised to encourage critical and creative thinking.
Interview Questions

  • What influences your decisions?
    • What do you think about when making decisions?
    • What does your community government think about when they make decisions?
  • How does history / the past influence your decisions?
    • What impact does history have on current community government decisions? (What does “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it” (George Santayana) mean to you?)
  • How far reaching are the impacts of decisions?
    (ie. Community, province, nation, world, universe)

    • Who is affected by your community government decisions?
    • How do you judge/determine the impact of your decisions?
  • What steps do you use in order to solve a problem?
    • How do community governments solve problems?
  • Have students chart examples of ways in which groups and communities make decisions noting similarities and differences and try to determine the kind of leadership practiced by the community government.
  • Note examples of how history impacts current decisions in either keeping something the same or deciding to make a change.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding.  Ideal demonstrations will be in authentic performance tasks.  Each citizenship study may have its own smaller assessment piece or be compiled to support one larger performance task assessment.  Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways.  Demonstrations of understanding may be done collaboratively or independently.
  • Students will show using a chain reaction graphic organizer a decision that they and/ or their family make on a regular basis (i.e., Grocery store where you buy apples – plot ripple effect showing where money goes.
    • Next plot who is supported, who (suppliers involved, growing and country of origin. If you change your decision, how does that change your chain?
  • Students will model problem-solving steps for a specific problem as yet unanswered and suggest alternate/two outcomes.
  • Students will summarize their understanding of the overarching questions. Students should explain their thinking and give evidence to support their thinking.
    • What does your community government think about when they make decisions?
    • What impact does history have on current community government decisions?
    • Community governments have a responsibility to the people who elected them. How does your community government demonstrate that responsibility?

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES

Students are keeping a Citizenship Journal to reflect upon their developing views of citizenship.  This section provides prompts for student journals.  Students are invited to choose one that interests them or propose their own. Students can also respond to any of the essential questions.

Students are encouraged to respond using a variety of genres.

  • Write about a specific problem you solved and tell how you think others perceived their solution.
    • Was your solution effective? How do you know?
    • Would you do something differently next time, why or why not?
    • What story does your chosen solution tell about you?
  • Would you like to be a leader? Why/Why not?
    • What qualities and skills do you have that make you a good leader?
    • What would you like to lead?
  • Respond to any of the Essential Questions.

Learning Plan

In this inquiry students will:

  • Identify the ways that communities look after their needs and wants.
  • Consider some of the challenges in reaching decisions.

CITIZENSHIP INQUIRY 2

Curricular Outcomes (Student friendly outcomes)

Appraise the ways communities meet their members’ needs and wants. (RW3.3)

Students will identify the ways that communities look after their needs and wants.

QUESTIONS TO GUIDE THE INQUIRY

Essential questions are posted and discussed with students at the start of the exploration of study. These open-ended questions are continually revisited; encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study; form the evidence of understanding; and, frame the assessment at the end of the unit of study. Guiding questions are posed to support student thinking as they explore the answers to the larger overarching questions.
Teachers may want to consider putting the questions into a “Before, During, After” chart to note the changes in students’ thinking as a result of the inquiries.
Essential Questions: Guiding Questions

  • What influences your decisions?
    • What do communities have to consider in meeting the members’ needs and wants?
  • How does history/the past influence your decisions?
    • How does history influence the way communities address meeting their members’ needs and wants?
  • How far reaching are the impacts of decisions?
    • How far reaching are the impacts of the community’s decisions in trying to meet their members’ needs and wants?
  • What story is my behaviour telling?
    • What story does the way your community tries to meets its members’ needs and wants tell about their citizenship responsibilities?

CONNECT TO TOPIC AND SURFACE STUDENTS’ THINKING ABOUT …

This section introduces the concepts and helps teachers gain an understanding of the current thinking of the class.  Present essential questions and allow students to think about and talk about.  Student answers will give teachers a baseline or beginning understanding of the amount of specific and incidental teaching required to explore these outcomes. Vocabulary is introduced and noted here.  This section frames the “We do” portion of the lesson where teachers guide the initial structure of the inquiry.
Process

  • Pose the essential and guiding questions and allow students to discuss their thoughts on the matter.
  • Determine what the students know, understand, need to be able to do to master/answer the essential questions (connect to content). Additional guiding questions can be added as required. Students are encouraged to add their questions to the others.
  • Create Know, Want to know, Learned Chart – identify vocabulary that requires development
  • Surface any additional questions students might have as a result of their discussions about the essential questions.
  • Post student answers for reflection at end of study.
Students will identify the ways that communities look after their needs and wants.
Who is responsible for meeting your needs?
Could you exist on your own?

  • What is the difference between needs and wants?
  • Should we get everything we want?
  • Should we get everything we need?
  • What questions do students have about how the community meets your needs and wants?

Post student thinking for later reflection.

DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson.  It describes the main activity(ies) involved.  In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that student make of the essential questions.  It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities. This forms the “We do” “They do” section of the inquiry where students are finding answers to the overarching questions and then searching for themes and patterns as possible explanations.
Teacher Note: Questions raised here can be addressed through research with print, media, or interviews with people. Group investigation and presentations are recommended in order to lead to increased discussion and understanding between students. Citizenship extends beyond the classroom so it is important to have students connect with community elders and/or members of the community governing bodies to talk with students about questions they have.

Students will develop an understanding of the challenges faced by communities in meeting needs and wants.

  • Identify needs/wants – large group
  • What are some of the community’s needs?

Brainstorm and search local newspapers with the large group to identify and list issues facing community. Group the needs according to specific categories identified by students (e.g., food and water, shelter, clothing, education, safety).

  • How are our needs currently met?

In groups have students consider basic needs and then identify how those needs are addressed. Assign specific area of need (identified earlier) to each group. Present findings to larger group.

  • What are some of the community’s wants? – large group

Have students brainstorm and can gather evidence from local newspapers and other media sources. Group the wants under the previously identified categories

Students will develop an understanding that sometimes communities cannot meet all the needs of their residents/members and must look outside the community.

  • Throughout the exploration of these questions examine historical recording of events and connect specific points of view/perspectives to worldview.
  • Have students reflect on the first interactions between First Nations people and newcomers to Canada
    • What was shared and why?
    • What sharing arrangements currently exist?
  • Have students reflect on the reasons why treaties were negotiated between First Nations people and the British Crown.
    • Identify points of view that impacted treaty negotiations.
    • What is the history of trying to meet identified Treaty responsibilities/obligations? (i.e., education, health, land sharing, etc.)
    • Track how far beyond the community governing members have gone to try to address people’s needs.
    • Group efforts according to provincial, federal responsibilities
  • What are the different points of view concerning this need/want?

APPLY AND EXTEND KNOWLEDGE

This section includes ideas to extend the inquiry or apply concepts explored. This section may also include additional reflective questions to promote student connection to the topic.  This forms the “You do” section of the inquiry – may be “you do it collaboratively” or “you do it alone”.   Invite students to extend their thinking beyond the classroom discussions and inquiry experiences.  Pose additional reflective questions that have been raised to encourage critical and creative thinking.  
Students will learn about global organizations that support communities.

Using the jigsaw study process assign each group of students one of the following organizations:

  • United Nations,
  • UNICEF,
  • Doctors Without Borders
  • Any additional groups that students might identify

Identify:

  • The mission and function (What they do and how they operate)
  • Focus on needs or wants?
  • Success rate
  • Why are these organizations necessary?
  • What story does the behaviour of these organizations tell about global responsibility and global citizenship?

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding.  Ideal demonstrations will be in authentic performance tasks.  Each citizenship study may have its own smaller assessment piece or be compiled to support one larger performance task assessment.  Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways.
then Demonstrate understanding

  • Describe ways in which communities help ensure basic human needs are met.
  • What are the needs/wants of our classroom/school?
  • How are those needs being met?
  • How can students support the work of the school in meeting community needs?
  • Could you exist on your own?
  • Who is responsible for meeting your needs?

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES

Students are keeping a Citizenship Journal to reflect upon their developing views of citizenship.  This section provides prompts for student journals.  Students are invited to choose one that interests them or propose their own. Students can also respond to any of the essential questions.

Students are encouraged to respond using a variety of genres.

  • What does community mean to you? What is community?
  • How far should your community government go in supporting your needs and wants?
  • Could you survive without your community?

Part C: Lifelong Learning Citizens Resources

RESOURCES

CROSS CURRICULAR CONNECTIONS

Language Arts
Themes

  • Personal and Philosophical: Students will:
    • believe in their own self-worth and feel that they have control over the things that happen to them;
    • look inward and focus on self-image and self-esteem; and,
    • reflect on self and life, and on their beliefs and values and those of their society.
  • Social, Cultural, and Historical: Students will:
    • look outward and examine their relationships with others, their community, and the world;
    • consider the social and historical context;
    • explore their connections in families, schools, groups, and communities to understand the diverse needs and wants of others; and,
    • show concern for other people in their relationships, groups, and communities.
  • Communicative: Students will:
    • consider the role of communication in their lives and the technologies and strategies that help people become effective communicators; and,
    • practice the skills to interact effectively with others.

Treaty Education

  • SI3: Examine how various teachings people have about the natural world guide behaviour and actions.
  • HC3: Explore the benefits that each of the parties to treaty enjoy.
  • TPP3: Explore how the use of different languages in treaty making presented challenges and how those challenges impact people today.

Health

Understanding, Skills, and Confidences (USC)

  • USC3.4 Understand what it means to contribute to the health of self, family and home.
  • USC3.5 Evaluate safe behaviours/practices to increase the safety of self and others while at home.

Science

  • Life Science: Plant Growth and Changes
    • PL3.2 Analyze the interdependence among plants, individuals, society, and the environment. [CP, DM, SI]
  • Earth and Space Science: Exploring Soils
    • ES3.2 Analyze the interdependence between soil and living things, including the importance of soil for individuals, society, and all components of the environment. [CP, DM]

Appendix: Lifelong Learning Citizens

GRADE 3 CITIZENSHIP STUDIES SELF, COMMUNITY, AND PLACE

Part A: Curricular Connections and Background

BROAD AREA OF CITIZENSHIP

Citizens with a Strong sense of Self, Community, and Place investigate their connectedness to school, community, and the natural environment. They are empowered to make choices that positively impact self and others. Being a member of any community allows certain rights; however, it also brings with it certain responsibilities to protect those rights and privileges.
A person’s “sense of place” develops through experience and knowledge of the history; geography and geology of an area; the legends of a place; and, a sense of the land and its history after living there for a time. Developing a sense of place helps students identify with their region and with each other. A strong sense of place can lead to more sensitive stewardship of our cultural history and natural environment.
In this area of study, students will examine the responsibilities that are inherent in all of these relationships. Students are encouraged to act on issues that are explored so that they can move toward becoming justice-oriented citizens. Because this area of citizenship begins with self and exploring issues of citizenship it is the primary area of focus for primary and elementary students.

OVERVIEW AND DESIRED RESULTS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Grade 3 students begin to investigate the responsibilities that occur through their connections to their school, community, and environment. They explore the interdependence of communities and the land and begin to examine how to fulfill their responsibility to care for their environment. Students begin to develop opinions about environmental stewardship and are encouraged to act on those beliefs.
Students continue to demonstrate respect for themselves and others and begin to address issues of bullying and injustice. Students practice skills of empathy and appreciate that people have different points of view on the same topic. They continue to develop ways of dealing with differences of opinion.
Appreciation for national, provincial, and community symbols and traditions of citizenship is expanded. Students extend their use of maps and globes to represent the Earth and consider why people choose to live and settle where they do.

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Citizens with a strong sense of Self, Community, and Place treat self and others with respect, have a sense of belonging to their home, family, and school community, and interact with, learn from, and care for the local environment.
  • Enduring understandings are the big ideas that stimulate thinking, guide the inquiry and are linked to outcomes.
  • Essential questions point to the “big ideas’ in the inquiry and should be considered and reconsidered as the inquiry progresses.
  • Answers to these questions form the evidence of learning at the end of study.
Students will use information to understand that:

  • Decision-making is a complex process with far-reaching impacts and is influenced by history.
  • A person’s worldview frames their understanding of the world.
  • Citizens value the need of the collective common good and consider how their actions impact the collective well-being.
  • Governments and the people who elect them are responsible to one another.
  • Empathy and respect for diversity in cultural and social groups help strengthen one’s community and require appreciation of different perspectives.
  • Individuals have the power to affect others and make a difference.
  • Canada has a long relationship with First Nations Peoples through treaty relationships.
  • Societies create rules, written and unwritten, to promote order that leads to inclusion or exclusion and are enforced by social behaviours and expectations.
  • Belonging requires participation and is a fundamental right of all citizens.
  • Active citizens become engaged in discussions, negotiations, debates and consider action regarding Canadian issues.

Inferences to make

  • Bystanders positive intervention likely stops bullying.
  • Empathy means understanding and appreciating another person’s perspective (i.e. Stop teasing when it’s gone too far).

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT

Students will know:

  • How to identify empathy
  • That the rules for belonging vary depending on the context of the group.

Students will continue to develop skills for:

  • Comparing and contrasting
  • Classifying
  • Explanation
  • Looking for alternate points of view.

Students will use their learning to:

  • Develop skills for treating self and others with respect
  • Demonstrate empathy in social situations
  • Continually reassess where and how they belong (changing contexts/roles and expectations) i.e. school, family, community
  • Examine their responsibility to self, community, and place.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

Essential Questions are open-ended questions that are continually revisited, encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study, form the evidence of understanding and frame the assessment at the end of the study.
  • What are the rules for belonging and how are they developed an enforced?
  • How do you control the impact of your actions/decisions?
  • How does empathy contribute to citizenship?
  • What power does the individual have to make a difference in the world?
  • What responsibility do you have to balance personal needs with the community’s needs?

CURRICULUM OUTCOMES AND INDICATORS

Student friendly outcomes should be posted throughout the inquiry and continually referenced so the goals of learning are clearly available to students.

Outcomes (Sask. Curriculum/Student Friendly)
RW3.2
Analyze the creation and distribution of wealth in communities studied.
Indicators:

  • Assess the role of work in communities, including the value of paid and unpaid work.
  • Define the term natural resources, and differentiate between renewable and non-renewable resources.
  • Determine reasons for acquisition of wealth in communities studied.
  • Identify how wealth is defined and acquired in communities studied.
  • Investigate and compare the distribution of wealth in communities studied.

RW3.3
Evaluate the ways in which technologies have impacted daily life.
Indicators:

  • Recognize that technology includes more than electronics (i.e., paper, forging steel, manufacturing, vehicles, making cloth, products created for construction).
  • Give examples of technologies in communities studied (e.g., communications, transportations, housing, food acquisition, preparation and storage, construction manufacturing), and categorize the influences of the application of the technology as positive or negative.

IN3.3
Illustrate examples of interdependence of communities.
Indicators:

  • Research the origins of products and items used by students in the local classroom.
  • Provide examples of ways in which student choices and actions may affect people elsewhere in the world) e.g., charitable donations, consumption of goods, recycling).
  • Identify products produced locally and sold elsewhere.

DR3.3
Compare the beliefs of various communities around the world regarding living on and with the land.
Indicators:

  • Research the view of land as held by indigenous peoples in communities studied.
  • Identify ways in which people in communities studied interact with the land (e.g., meeting needs and wants, how lands is protected or neglected).
  • Identify local environmental issues that affect life in communities studied.
  • Compare environmental concerns (e.g., air quality, soil conservation, water availability and quality) common to both the local community and communities studied.

Overarching Outcome
DR3.1
Use various model representations of the Earth.
Indicators:

  • Demonstrate understanding that the surface of the Earth can be represented through maps, aerial photographs, and satellite images.
  • Identify geographic concepts including continents, countries, borders, hemispheres, and the equator.
  • Locate and identify the continents and oceans on a map or globe.
  • Locate and identify countries or regions studied on a map or globe.

DR 3.2
Assess the degree to which the geography and related environmental and climatic factors influence ways of living on and with the land.
Indicators:

  • Identify the influences that geography has on societies (e.g., location of settlements, transportation of goods and people, types of industry such as farming, ranching, forestry, mining, tourism, and manufacturing).
  • Recognized how environmental and climatic factors are influenced by location (e.g., proximity to water bodies influences precipitation and temperature; mountainous terrain influences soil formation, precipitation, and temperature).

Part B: Learning Plan

In this inquiry students will:

  • Learn how communities work together to support one another
  • Think about the impact of their lifestyle choices on the environment

CITIZENSHIP INQUIRY 1

Post student friendly outcomes as a reference throughout study.

  • Illustrate examples of interdependence of communities. (IN3.3)

Students will understand how communities work together to support one another.

  • Evaluate the ways in which technologies have impacted daily life. (RW 3.3)

Students will know how they use technology in their daily life.

QUESTIONS TO GUIDE INQUIRY

Process

  • Pose the essential and guiding questions and allow students to discuss their thoughts on the matter.
  • Determine what the students know, understand, need to be able to do to master/answer the essential questions (connect to content). Additional guiding questions can be added as required. Students are encouraged to add their questions to the others.
  • Create Know, Want to know, Learned Chart – identify vocabulary that requires development
  • Surface any additional questions students might have as a result of their discussions about the essential questions.
  • Post student answers for reflection at end of study.
Essential Questions: Guiding Questions

  • How do you control the impact of your actions and decisions?
    • How far reaching is the impact of your choices/decisions/actions?
  • What responsibility do you have to balance personal needs with the community’s needs?
    • How does meeting your needs impact self, community, and/or place?
  • Describe the power you have to make a difference in the world.
    • What could you do right now to change your community? The world?
  • What does empathy contribute to citizenship?
    • How might someone else view this situation?
    • How does the community look after individuals? / people?
    • How do communities work with one another?
    • How does meeting your needs/wants impact the world?
    • How far reaching are the impacts of your choices?

Vocabulary

  • empathy
  • belief
  • technology
  • needs
  • wants
  • environment
  • resources

CONNECT TO TOPIC AND SURFACE STUDENTS’ THINKING ABOUT …

This section introduces the concepts and helps teachers gain an understanding of the current thinking of the class.  Present essential questions and allow students to think about and talk about.  Student answers will give teachers a baseline or beginning understanding of the amount of specific and incidental teaching required to explore these outcomes. Vocabulary is introduced and noted here.  This section frames the “We do” portion of the lesson where teachers guide the initial structure of the inquiry.
Present essential questions to students at the start of the exploration of study. As students make meaning of the outcomes, the answers to these questions will frame their thinking at the end of the unit of study.
 

Do a quick survey or scan around the room and have students place 2-3 objects that they use everyday and put in a central place for reflection and discussion.

  • Where do the products/goods that you use come from?
  • How many countries do your choices impact in a day? in a week?
  • What countries do you impact on a daily basis? Weekly?
  • How long could you live only using the goods that this community/province produces?
  • What would it require for you to live on the 50 km diet? (goods produces within a 50 km radius.)
  • How does meeting your needs/wants impact the world?
  • How far reaching are the impacts of your choices?
  • How does the community look after individuals? / people?
  • How do communities work with one another? How many communities are impacted by your choices?

Have students try to answer the questions. Since this is the connecting, front-loading part of the inquiry, students may not have many answers to the questions. Chart the students’ answers for later reflection.

DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson.  It describes the main activity(ies) involved.  In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that student make of the essential questions.  It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities. This forms the “We do” “They do” section of the inquiry where students are finding answers to the overarching questions and then searching for themes and patterns as possible explanations.
Students will develop the understanding that the products they use are often produced outside of their community and that their choices have global impact.

  • Have groups of students go on a hunt in the classroom and then in the school and pick 10 things in total that they use in a day. Categorize according to needs and wants. Identify descriptors for the categories i.e., food, survival, entertainment, clothing, technology.
  • (Note that technology includes more than electronics (i.e., paper, forging steel, manufacturing, vehicles, making cloth, products created for construction).
  • Have students research the origins of products and items on their lists. Identify what is required to have the product reach Canada.
  • Begin to identify patterns according to needs and wants and the amount of effort it requires to obtain the materials/products.
  • Have students develop statements that summarize where the products from their needs and wants list/necessity-luxury are produced.
  • Have students create a list of needs and wants items from home. Where are most of these items produced? Have students make a summary statement identifying the origins of products on their wants list and needs list. Can they make a generalization about the origin of products used at home and at school?
  • How far reaching are their choices? What products are produced locally? Provincially? Nationally? Globally? Chart for reference and reflection.
  • In groups, have students pick 3 essential products and three non-essential products and trace the path from origin to delivery of each.
  • What is the impact that using those products places on the environment and people in other countries? Consider technology use, environmental impact, and resource use impact. Develop a summary statement to explain and clarify student thinking.

APPLY AND EXTEND KNOWLEDGE

This section includes ideas to extend the inquiry and/or apply concepts explored. This section may also include additional reflective questions to promote student connection to the topic.  Reflective questions encourage critical and creative thinking.
Students will continue to explore the effects of their choices on the larger community and begin to examine how their choices and actions may affect people elsewhere in the world (e.g., charitable donations, consumption of goods, recycling).

  • Identify products produced locally and sold elsewhere. Begin with the immediate community and move outwards to region and province.
  • Map the countries that produce products used by students.
  • Is there a pattern to the choices that students are making? i.e., Where do most of the food choices come from? Do those patterns change with the seasons?
  • What kind of an environmental footprint do the choices leave? Begin with food packaging. Students could bring in packaging from a week’s worth of food and then categorize that according to bio-degradable, plastics, non-biodegradable, etc. Talk about the impact on the environment.
What are students noticing about their choices…

  • Are the needs/wants choices being supplied locally, provincially, nationally, globally?
  • What countries are supplying most of their needs?
  • Why did these patterns, trading habits/arrangements develop?
  • Who benefits from these arrangements?

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding.  Ideal demonstrations will be in authentic performance tasks.  Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways.
Students have been exploring the answers to these overarching questions.

  • How does meeting my needs impact myself, community, and/or place?
  • How far reaching is the impact of my choices/decisions/actions?
  • What are the beneficial effects/impacts to my choices?/Who benefits from my choices?
  • What are the negative effects of my choices?
  • How might someone else view this situation? (empathy, alternate perspective)
  • What could you do right now to change the negative impacts? (Describe the power you have to make a difference in the world.)

How long could you live only using the goods that this community produces? Is it possible for anyone to live on only the goods they produce in a 50 km radius? What changes would be required?

  • Have students represent the answers to the overarching questions above. (Possible representation options – prepare a brochure, develop a commercial, prepare a Smart board presentation.)
  • See Rubric options demonstrating understanding for assessment guidelines.
  • Revisit K-W-L chart as a whole class to see if questions and ‘want to knows’ were addressed.

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES

Students are keeping a Citizenship Journal to reflect upon their developing views of citizenship.  This section provides prompts for student journals.  Students are invited to choose one that interests them or propose their own. Students can also respond to any of the essential questions.

Students are encouraged to respond using a variety of genres.

  • How does meeting your needs impact someone else? Decide whether this impact is positive or negative? How could you change the impact right now?

Students have been exploring how individuals and communities work together to ensure that basic human needs are met. Safety and belonging to a group is a basic human need.

  • What kind of friend am I? How do I treat others? Do I make others feel safe and secure? Why or why not?

Further Investigation Suggestions

Students have been developing empathy by considering how others might view or feel about a similar situation. They also have also been asked to reflect upon their actions and to consider how to make a difference in their world.

  • Note when students demonstrate empathy toward another person and tries to advocate for or support the individual.
  • Simulations – situations where students would feel empathy for others vs. just sympathy.
  • Have students role play solutions to different bullying situations.
  • Note when bystanders try to have a positive impact and stop bullying. (When to walk away, report it, verbally stand up, etc…)

If schools are using any behavioural programs at school i.e. 4th R or Respect Ed the suggested responses to behavioural situations should be noted as demonstration of student understanding of empathy and appreciation of other points of view.

Learning Plan

Curricular Outcomes (Student friendly outcomes)

Compare the beliefs of various communities around the world regarding living on and with the land. (DR3.3)

Students will examine how people’s beliefs about the environment impact the relationship they have with the land and the way that land is used.

CITIZENSHIP INQUIRY 2

QUESTIONS TO GUIDE INQUIRY

Essential questions are posted and discussed with students at the start of the exploration of study. These open-ended questions are continually revisited; encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study; form the evidence of understanding; and, frame the assessment at the end of the unit of study. Guiding questions are posed to support student thinking as they explore the answers to the larger overarching questions.
Teachers may want to consider putting the questions into a “Before, During, After” chart to note the changes in students’ thinking as a result of the inquiries.
Essential Questions: Guiding Questions

  • How do you control the impact of your actions/decisions?
    • How far reaching is the impact of my choices/decisions/actions?
  • What responsibility do you have to balance personal needs with the community’s needs?
    • What do the ways in which I meet my needs say about my relationship with my self, community, and/or place?
  • What does empathy contribute to citizenship?
    • How might someone else view this situation?
    • Do other cultures use products in the same way that you do?
  • Describe the power you have to make a difference in the world.
    • What could you do right now to change the world?

CONNECT TO TOPIC AND SURFACE STUDENTS’ THINKING ABOUT …

This section introduces the concepts and helps teachers gain an understanding of the current thinking of the class. Present essential questions and allow students to think about and talk about. Student answers will give teachers a baseline or beginning understanding of the amount of specific and incidental teaching required to explore these outcomes. Vocabulary is introduced and noted here. This section frames the “We do” portion of the lesson where teachers guide the initial structure of the inquiry.
Students have been exploring the impact their choices have on the local community, provincial community, and global community. Students will be challenged to extend their thinking and consider what other cultures/worldviews feel about using the environment. Students will examine how people’s beliefs about the environment impact the relationship they have with the land.
What does this classroom believe about the way we use the environment?

Students have been studying the impacts of their choices to fulfill their needs and wants and have found that they use products, materials, and technology on a daily basis that come from all over the world.

  • What story is our behaviour telling about what we believe about how we can use the environment?
  • In groups have students develop an answer to the question and explain their thinking.
  • Present the statements to the class and chart for reflection. Classify the statements as positive or negative use of the environment.
  • Have the class develop a summary statement that would reflect the entire class experiences. Post for later reflection.

What does this classroom do to protect the environment?

  • In groups have students identify what they do to protect the environment?
  • How closely do those statements connect with one another? Agree/Support – Disagree/Counterproductive
  • How might another culture view the two statements?
  • Create Know, Want to Know, Learned chart to track learning throughout citizenship study. Surface additional questions that students have.
  • Identify vocabulary understandings that must be developed.
DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson.  It describes the main activity(ies) involved.  In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that student make of the essential questions.  It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities.
Teachers are encouraged to have students work in pairs or small groups to find the answers to the following questions. It is important that students have the opportunity to talk with one another to come to a consensus about their findings.

  • Students will examine the ways that different cultures interact with the land and try to find connections between worldviews and use of the land.
  • Develop understanding of worldview or belief system
    • Research the view of land as held by Indigenous peoples within your Treaty region.
    • Identify predominant cultures within the community and research the view of the land as held by people with the community.
    • Students are encouraged to interview representatives of the communities studied as well as research print media.
    • Have students describe the worldviews of the cultures studied.
  • Develop an understanding of the ways in which people in communities studied interact with the land (e.g., meeting needs and wants, how land is protected or neglected).
    • Have students identify how the communities studied:
      • Meet their needs and wants
      • Protect the land
      • Neglect the land
      • Give examples or evidence to substantiate your statements
    • Have students indicate whether the worldviews and the way the land is used match each other by considering the response to the following overarching understanding or essential question.
      • What do the ways in which my studied community meet their needs say about their relationship with self, community, and/or place?
      • Our research shows there is a match between the worldview and the use of land because….
      • Our research shows there is not a match between the worldview and the use of land because…
      • Our research shows there is a partial match between the worldview and the use of land because…
    • Present the summary statements from the group studies.
    • Have the students vote on whether there is a match between the worldviews and the responses. Create a continuum in the classroom with one end indicating agreement and the other indicating disagreement with the statement. Have students vote by standing at a specific place in the continuum.
    • Have students discuss their choice of answer with a student at a different place on the voting continuum. Students should justify their position with evidence.
    • Develop a class summary statement to the essential question.

APPLY AND EXTEND KNOWLEDGE

This section includes ideas to extend the inquiry or apply concepts explored. This section may also include additional reflective questions to promote student connection to the topic.  This forms the “You do” section of the inquiry – may be “you do it collaboratively” or “you do it alone”.   Invite students to extend their thinking beyond the classroom discussions and inquiry experiences.  Pose additional reflective questions that have been raised to encourage critical and creative thinking. 
  • Identify local environmental issues that affect life in communities studied.
  • Compare environmental concerns (e.g., air quality, soil conservation, water availability and quality) common to both the local community and communities studied.
  • Have students develop a possible solution to the identified environmental concerns.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding.  Ideal demonstrations will be in authentic performance tasks.  Each citizenship study may have its own smaller assessment piece or be compiled to support one larger performance task assessment.  Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways.  Demonstrations of understanding may be done collaboratively or independently.
Following are the essential or overarching questions that students considered during this citizenship study.

  • What do the ways in which I meet my needs say about my relationship with myself, community, and/or place?
  • How far reaching is the impact of my choices/decisions/actions on the environment?
  • How might someone else view this situation?
  • What could you do right now to change the world/situation?
  • Why is this information important to know?
  • What will students do with this new learning?

Have students choose one of the previously identified environmental concerns and develop responses to the overarching questions. Have students identify an action plan that they could begin that would change the identified environmental concern.

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES

Students are keeping a Citizenship Journal to reflect upon their developing views of citizenship.  This section provides prompts for student journals.  Students are invited to choose one that interests them or propose their own. Students can also respond to any of the essential questions.

Students are encouraged to respond using a variety of genres.

  • Why would communities neglect their responsibilities to the environment?
  • What is an environmental issue that concerns you?
  • What can you do as a concerned citizen to begin to address your concern?

Part C: Self, Community, and Place Resources

RESOURCES

CROSS CURRICULAR CONNECTIONS

Language Arts
Themes

  • Personal and Philosophical: Students will:
    • believe in their own self-worth and feel that they have control over the things that happen to them;
    • look inward and focus on self-image and self-esteem; and,
    • reflect on self and life, and on their beliefs and values and those of their society.
  • Social, Cultural, and Historical: Students will:
    • look outward and examine their relationships with others, their community, and the world;
    • consider the social and historical context;
    • explore their connections in families, schools, groups, and communities to understand the diverse needs and wants of others; and,
    • show concern for other people in their relationships, groups, and communities.
  • Communicative: Students will:
    • consider the role of communication in their lives and the technologies and strategies that help people become effective communicators; and,
    • practice the skills to interact effectively with others.
  • Environmental and Technological: Students will:
    • explore the elements of the natural and constructed worlds and the role of technology and related developments in their society; and,
    • explore the needs and characteristics of living things; properties of objects and materials; the five senses; and daily seasonal changes.

Treaty Education

  • TR3: Examine the relationships between First Nation peoples and the land, before and after the signing of treaties.
  • SI3: Examine how various teachings people have about the natural world guide behaviour and actions.
  • HC3: Explore the benefits that each of the parties to treaty enjoy.
  • TPP3: Explore how the use of different languages in treaty making presented challenges and how those challenges impact people today.

Health

Understanding, Skills, and Confidences (USC)

  • USC3.5 Evaluate safe behaviours/practices to increase the safety of self and others while at home.
  • USC3.6 Distinguish between examples of real violence (e.g., schoolyard fights, shaking a baby, bullying) and fictional violence (e.g., cartoons, world wrestling entertainment, video games) and determine the influence of both on health and well-being.

Science

Life Science: Plant Growth and Changes

  • PL3.2 Analyze the interdependence among plants, individuals, society, and the environment. [CP, DM, SI]

Earth and Space Science: Exploring Soils

  • ES3.2 Analyze the interdependence between soil and living things, including the importance of soil for individuals, society, and all components of the environment. [CP, DM]
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