GRADE 4 RESOURCES

The Intentional & Direct Teaching of Essential Citizenship Competencies

GRADE 4 CITIZENSHIP STUDIES ENGAGED CITIZENS

Part A: Curricular Connections and Background

BROAD AREA OF CITIZENSHIP

Engaged Citizens understand and value the historical and contemporary diversity in groups. They explore the relationship between beliefs, rights, and responsibility on a school, community, and national level. They are gaining an understanding and appreciation of the different types of governance at the local and national levels. Students are learning that there are different points of view or perspectives to issues and that rules can have different impacts on groups of people.

OVERVIEW AND DESIRED RESULTS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Students will actively engage in:

  • Exploring the relationships between beliefs, rights, and responsibilities on a school, community, and national level; and,
  • Understanding the different types of governance at the local and national levels.

Students will extend their exploration of rules and societal order to the workings of the various governing systems in Saskatchewan including First Nations and Métis governance and provincial governance structures. Students are beginning to understand the impact of the differing levels of government and understand the connections between varying levels of responsibility. They also see that rules have different impacts on groups of people. Students will continue to develop their understanding of the relationship between rights and responsibilities as they pertain to engaged citizenship.

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Students will use information to understand that:

  • Decision-making is a complex process with far-reaching impacts and is influenced by history.
  • A person’s worldview frames their understanding of the world.
  • Citizens value the need of the collective common good and consider how their actions impact the collective well-being.
  • Governments and the people who elect them are responsible to one another.
  • Empathy and respect for diversity in cultural and social groups help strengthen one’s community and requires appreciation of different perspectives.
  • Individuals have the power to affect others and make a difference.
  • Canada has a long relationship with First Nations Peoples through treaty relationships.
  • Societies create rules, written and unwritten, to promote order that lead to inclusion or exclusion and are enforced by social behaviours and expectations.
  • Belonging requires participation and is a fundamental right of all citizens.
  • Active citizens become engaged in discussions, negotiations, debates and consider action regarding Canadian issues.
  • Enduring understandings are the big ideas that stimulate thinking, guide the inquiry and are linked to outcomes.
  • Essential questions point to the “big ideas’ in the inquiry and should be considered and reconsidered as the inquiry progresses.
  • Answers to these questions form the evidence of learning at the end of

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT

Students will be able to:

  • Determine the governing body and the rules or laws they develop so they can determine fairness, sphere of influence, and advocate effectively to support or change the rules or laws;
  • Determine the impact of rules on diverse groups that live in Canada;
  • Determine the sphere of influence of rules that govern behavior of the province of Saskatchewan; and,
  • Determine a process for advocacy.
Skill Development

As teachers work with students to develop meaning it is important to reinforce the skills that connect to long-term independent accomplishments. This section identifies specific skills that students will learn.

  • Critical thinking
  • Speaking presenting
  • Research

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

  • How do people who live together organize themselves?
  • How much do rules matter?
  • Who monitors the rule makers?
  • How much power should leaders have?
  • To whom are rule makers responsible?
  • Why do all Canadians have an investment in treaty relationships?
Essential Questions are open-ended questions that are continually revisited, encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study, form the evidence of understanding and frame the assessment at the end of the study.

CURRICULUM OUTCOMES AND INDICATORS

Outcomes: Student Friendly Outcomes
PA 4.2
Demonstrate an understanding of the Provincial system of government: Students will be able to explain how the provincial government works.
Indicators:

  • Differentiate between rules and laws.
  • Differentiate between rights and responsibilities.
  • Describe the relationship between three levels of government in Canada, including local (i.e., municipal, band), provincial or territorial, and federal.
  • Identify elected local, provincial, and federal heads of government.
  • Compare how laws are made at the local and provincial levels.

PA4.3 + 4.4
Demonstrate an understanding of First Nations and Métis systems of governance: Students will be able to explain the First Nations and Métis systems of Governance.
Indicators:

  • Research the structures of governance in First Nations communities (e.g., local band council, tribal council, Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations, Assembly of First Nations).
  • Compare the traditional processes for selection of leaders in First Nations communities to current practices for selection of leaders in First Nations.
  • Compile an inventory of issues of current focus for First Nations governments in Saskatchewan.
  • Research the structures of governance of Métis people in Saskatchewan (e.g., Métis local, Métis Nation of Saskatchewan, Métis National Council).
  • Compare the traditional processes for selection of leaders of Métis people to current practices for selection of leaders by the Métis people.
  • Compile an inventory of issues of current focus for Métis governments in Saskatchewan.

PA 4.1
Analyze the relationship between governance institutions in Saskatchewan and the scope of influence on various groups of people in the province: Students will learn how the different governance groups in Saskatchewan work together and how they impact people.
Indicators:

  • Identify ways in which Saskatchewan people can be involved in making decisions, which affect their local communities (e.g., run as a candidate for school board, local government, or band elections; vote during elections; attend community forums).
  • Illustrate the organization of the municipal or band decision-making process, including the name of the sitting mayor, reeve, or chief.
  • Describe ways in which Saskatchewan people can be involved in the democratic process regarding decisions which affect their province, and explain why it is important to be an active participant in the democratic process (e.g., vote in provincial elections; belong to a political party; run for member of the provincial or First Nations legislative assembly; communicate with the member of the legislative assembly about issues of concern).
  • Represent the structure of the provincial decision-making process in Saskatchewan naming the sitting premier, the leader of the opposition, and the local member of the legislative assembly.
  • Investigate the methods the provincial government uses to raise revenue (e.g., resource revenues, taxes on consumption, provincial sales tax, fuel tax, tax on cigarettes and alcohol) to pay for services and evaluate the impact on quality of life for Saskatchewan people (e.g., health care, education, highways, social services, justice).
  • Analyze how the symbols of Saskatchewan, including the coat of arms, the flag, and the provincial motto, Treaty flags and anthem, Métis flag, etc. reflect the values and qualities of the people and the government of Saskatchewan.

TEACHER BACKGROUND

  • First Nations and Métis governance Organization
    • Band decision making processes – power distribution
    • Teachers are reminded to talk with and use information from the local First Nations within their respective treaty areas when researching and teaching these concepts.

Part B: Learning Plan

In this inquiry students will:

  • Learn about the provincial system of government.
  • Learn about the First Nations and Métis systems of governance.
  • Investigate how the different governance groups in Saskatchewan interact and what the sphere of influence is for each governing level or who each group affects.

QUESTIONS TO GUIDE INQUIRY

Essential questions are posted and discussed with students at the start of the exploration of study. These open-ended questions are continually revisited; encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study; form the evidence of understanding; and, frame the assessment at the end of the unit of study. Guiding questions are posed to support student thinking as they explore the answers to the larger overarching questions.
Teachers may want to consider putting the questions into a “Before, During, After” chart to note the changes in students’ thinking as a result of the inquiries.

Essential Questions – Guiding Questions:

  • How do people who live together organize themselves?
    • What do people do to get along?
  • Why do we need rules? How much do rules matter?
    • How do rules differ from home, school, community, and nationally?
    • How do rules differ from one group of people to another?
  • How much power should leaders have?
    • How do our leaders get power?
    • How do we regulate our rule makers?
  • Who monitors the rule makers?
    • How do the rule makers decide what rules/laws to make?
    • What should they consider when making a rule?
  • To whom are rule makers responsible?
  • Should a rule be fair?
    • Do rules affect everyone the same way?
  • Why do all Canadians have an investment in treaty relationships?
    • What are the benefits of understanding treaty promises?
    • What are the hazards of not understanding treaty promises?

CONNECT TO TOPIC AND SURFACE STUDENTS’ THINKING ABOUT …

This section introduces the concepts and helps teachers gain an understanding of the current thinking of the class. Present essential questions and allow students to think about and talk about. Student answers will give teachers a baseline or beginning understanding of the amount of specific and incidental teaching required to explore these outcomes. Vocabulary is introduced and noted here. This section frames the “We do” portion of the lesson where teachers guide the initial structure of the inquiry.

INQUIRY 1

Are there similarities to groups?
Are there certain ways to organize groups?

  • What rules do you have to follow? Your siblings? Caregivers? Parents? Elders? Teachers? Police? School? City? Province?
  • Who makes up these rules? Who has to follow the rules?

Begin to list the different people or groups that make up rules. Keep these lists and use later to categorize and identify spheres of influence.

  • What do these rules have in common? How are these rules different?

Begin to categorize rules according to purpose. Students will begin to see that rules serve different purposes.

  • What is the purpose/reason for these rules? Who do these rules impact?

Have students make a general statement about their thinking on why we have rules.

  • What is the difference between a rule and a law?

Create Know, Want to know, Learned Chart. Identify vocabulary that requires development- include derivatives of word i.e. govern – governing, government. Surface additional student questions.

Begin the inquiry by having students consider an organization that they belong to or with which they have some form of reference, their school.

Questions posed here form the basis of the later inquiry of differing levels of governance. Use the discussion with students to clarify any misunderstandings so that students will be clear on what they are being asked to research later in the inquiry.
Area of Responsibility

i) Does a school make laws or rules? Give examples.

ii) What is the process for doing this?

iii) Who has to follow their rules or laws? (Sphere of influence)

Organizational Structure

i) How is this school organized? Who are their leaders? (chart)

ii) How do people get those positions? Who can get these positions?

iii) To whom are these governing groups/bodies responsible? (Who do they look after?

)
Citizenship Connection

i) As a member (citizen) of this school what is your responsibility to this school? (How do you provide support?)

ii) If you wanted to make some changes at this school how could you do that?

iii) What things/issues is this school concerned about?

DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson. It describes the main activity(ies) involved. In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that student make of the essential questions. It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities. This forms the “We do” “They do” section of the inquiry where students are finding answers to the overarching questions and then searching for themes and patterns as possible explanations.
Governance models:

  • Towns, cities, Rural Municipalities, Bands (as appropriate)
  • Province
  • First Nations – Bands, Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN)
  • Métis Nation – Métis Locals, Métis Nation of Saskatchewan
  • Federal

Examine the governance of one of the governance models identified above.

Area of Responsibility

i) Does this governing body make laws or rules? Give examples.

ii) What is the process for doing this?

iii) Who has to follow their rules or laws? (Sphere of influence)

Organizational Structure

i) How is this governing body organized? Who are their leaders? (chart)

ii) How do people get those positions? Who can get these positions?

iii) To whom are these governing groups/bodies responsible? (Who do they look after?)

iv) How do they support themselves? (Where does the money come from?)

Citizenship Connection

i) As a citizen what is your responsibility to this level of governance? (How do you provide support?)

ii) How can someone influence leaders/rule makers in this organization?

iii) What are some things this organization is concerned about?

Group Discussion

In each of the three areas studied:

  • What do all these governing bodies have in common?
  • What is different about them?
  • How are these governing bodies connected to one another?
  • How do these governing bodies support my rights?
  • What is my responsibility to these governing bodies?

APPLY AND EXTEND KNOWLEDGE

This section includes ideas to extend student thinking and apply concepts explored. This section may also include additional reflective questions to promote student connection to the topic. Reflective questions encourage critical and creative thinking.
What’s happening here? Now?

  • Throughout this inquiry clip newspaper, magazine articles that pertain to the topic and post them in a central place. Have students think about and talk about the level(s) of governance that has responsibility for these issues. Assign each level of governance a coloured pin and have students identify the level of governance responsibility associated with each issue. Students can begin to see the overlap between the areas of responsibility and the varying levels of governance.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding. Ideal demonstrations will be in authentic performance tasks. Each citizenship study may have its own smaller assessment piece or be compiled to supportone larger performance task assessment. Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways. Demonstrations of understanding may be done collaboratively or independently.
Revisit the Essential and Guiding Questions from the beginning of the inquiry. What changes would they make to their thinking after the inquiry?

Have students…

  • Choose a local, provincial, or national issue – from the bulletin board or from a current inventory of issues facing people in the province. Identify the issue from their perspective indicating who this issue impacts and the levels of governance involved.
  • Identify ways in which they as an engaged citizen can be involved in the democratic processes regarding the outcome of this specific issue or decision. Explain why it is important to be concerned about this issue.

Consult Rubric options to determine understanding of identified outcomes.

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES

Students are keeping a Citizenship Journal to reflect upon their developing views of citizenship. This section provides prompts for student journals. Students are invited to choose one that interests them and respond in any way that allows them to demonstrate their thoughts, including art, music, and dance.
  • Why do we need rules/laws? Could we exist without them? Explain your thinking.
  • Does our present government structure work? How could you make it better?
  • Would you like to become a decision-maker? Why or why not?
  • What would you do to promote citizenship if you were the mayor?

Part C: Engaged Citizens Resources

RESOURCES

  • Take Actions! – A guide to Active Citizenship by Craig Kielburger and Marc Kielburger
  • Canadian Citizenship in Action – 3 books published by Weigl Education Publishers Ltd.
    • What is Citizenship
    • Individual Power
    • Citizenship in a Democracy
  • Take Action – Make a difference – A social Studies Handbook by J. Craig Harding & Alan Sears
  • Canadian Citizenship in Action – Weigl Education Publishers ltd. –Textbook
  • Action Magazine – Heroes and Idols – Who is your Hero – Pearson
  • www.liveinonline.ca – Heroes or Zeros
  • Courage and Compassion – Ten Canadians who made a difference – A wow Canada Book Rona Arato
  • Peace by Piece – Red Cross Classroom – Canadian Red Cross – FREE RESOURCE
  • Canadian Government – Grades 4-6 – Popular Book Company Canada Ltd.
  • Local Government in Saskatchewan – An Instructional Resource for Gr. 4 www.ssta.sk.ca
  • Video – “Lisa Visits the Legislature”
  • Who Runs this Country Anyway? A Guide to Canadian Government by Joanne Stanbridge
  • Canadian Citizenship by Don Wells
  • Provincial and Territorial Governments by Anita Yasuda
  • Municipal Government by Steve Goldsworthy
  • Canada Votes by Linda Granfield
  • The Charter for Children – 10 books by Dustin Milligan – These books introduce children to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and explain their rights as a citizen. This series aims to empower children by providing them with a basic awareness of their rights and by fostering a respect for the basic values that Canadians cherish
  • Let’s Do Something About Poverty (Poverty Free Saskatchewan) www.povertyfreesask.ca This website has many strategies to eliminate poverty (Promoting Health strategy used to start our healthy food drive. See further investigation section below)
  • http://dc-canada.ca/Charter_for_Children.html Charter of Rights and Freedoms books series for children. Also good for primary students.

CROSS CURRICULAR CONNECTIONS

Language Arts

  • Themes
    • Social, Cultural, and Historical: Students will:
      • examine the relationships with others, their community, and the world
      • consider the social and historical context
      • explore their connections in families, schools, groups, and communities and to understand the diverse needs and wants of others
      • show concern for other people in their relationships, groups, and communities.
    • Environmental and Technological: Students will:
      • explore the elements of the natural and constructed worlds and the role of technology and related developments in their society
      • explore the needs and characteristics of living things; properties of objects and materials; the five senses; and daily seasonal changes.
    • Personal and Philosophical: Students will:
      • believe in their own self-worth and to feel that they have control over the things that happen to them
      • focus on self-image and self-esteem
      • reflect on self and life, and on their beliefs and values and those of their society.

Treaty Education

  • HC43: Explore the historical reasons why people entered into treaty.
  • TPP44: Examine the objectives of the First Nations and British Crown’s representatives in negotiating treaty.

Health

  • USC4.3: Examine healthy interpersonal skills and determine strategies to effectively develop new relationships and/or negotiate disagreements in relationships
  • USC4.4: Determine basic personal responsibility for safety and protection in various environments/situations
  • USC4.5: Examine how identity (i.e., self-concept, self-esteem, self-determination) is influenced by relationships that are formed with others.
  • DM4.1: Investigate the importance of personal responsibility and communication in making informed decisions related to healthy eating and physical activity, prevention/ management of health challenges, negotiating disagreements, safety and protection, personal identity, and stressors.

FURTHER INVESTIGATION SUGGESTIONS

  • Organize a petition
  • Contact an elected official, band office
  • Become a student representative
  • Volunteer at your city councilors office, band office, mayors
  • Lobby governments
  • Choose a current issue – make a plan – and begin action
  • Do something in the school that shows you understood what it meant to be an engaged citizen. i.e. Students organize a healthy food drive to support citizens of Saskatoon who are going through tough times. Collect items for the Saskatoon Food Bank. Write an article for the Star Phoenix talking about the impact of the cost of poverty in Saskatchewan.
  • Use current events to spark conversations and debates.
  • Students create an assembly to teach the other classes in the school all about being a good and engaged citizen. Present information they learned through the inquiry study at the assembly.

GRADE 4 CITIZENSHIP STUDIES LIFELONG LEARNING CITIZENS

Part A: Curricular Connections and Background

BROAD AREA OF CITIZENSHIP

Lifelong Learning Citizens are developing the skills to critically examine and actively explore and analyze events and the effects of decisions made at a local, national, or global level. They are learning that there are different points of view or perspectives to issues and think about how rules and laws have different impacts on different groups of people.
Students are asked to understand and be aware of their thinking and the ways in which they make meaning of information explored. It is through ongoing examination and reflection of the processes of critical thinking that understanding of citizenship issues and transferring understandings to new but similar situations will occur.

DESIRED RESULTS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Canada is a country that affirms diversity and believes that our cultural mosaic serves to enrich our country. Saskatchewan is a province that was settled by people moving to this area from other countries and other parts of Canada. Students will be examining the different groups of people who contributed to the make-up of the province and will understand that First Nations lived in Saskatchewan prior to any other people moving to the province and provided support to people new to Saskatchewan.
They will learn about the various cultures that have shaped Saskatchewan communities; analyze the contributions of First Nations and Métis people to the province, historically and currently; and, learn about the influence that the climate and geography of Saskatchewan had on the decisions made by the people and the development of the province.
Students will actively engage in:

  • Understanding the dynamics of change, seeking new information and developing the skills for action;
  • Developing a critical understanding of and actively exploring and analyzing events and the effects of decisions on a local, national and global level.

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Students will use information to understand that:

  • Respect for diversity in cultural social groups helps strengthen one’s community.
  • Diversity in a country leads to a diversity of perspectives.
  • Decision-making is a complex process with far reaching impacts.
  • Canada has a long relationship with First Nations Peoples through treaty relationships.
  • Historical events have an impact on decisions made today.
  • Enduring understandings are the big ideas that stimulate thinking, guide the inquiry and are linked to outcomes.
  • Essential questions point to the “big ideas’ in the inquiry and should be considered and reconsidered as the inquiry progresses.
  • Answers to these questions form the evidence of learning at the end of study.

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT

Students will know:

  • The significance of historical events and use this knowledge to reflect on current and future decision making.
  • The impact that worldviews may play on a person’s perspectives.
  • Decisions have far reaching effects.
  • Treaty contracts are binding.
  • There are alternate ways to solve problems.

Students will develop skills for:

  • Examining/interpreting worldviews
  • Research
  • Determining outcomes of problem solving steps

Students will use their independent learning to:

  • Examine multiple world views
  • Understand the ripple effect of decision-making
  • Use historical events to guide current and future decision-making
Skill Development

As teachers work with students to develop meaning it is important to reinforce the skills that connect to long-term independent accomplishments. This section identifies specific skills that students will learn.

  • Critical thinking
  • Research

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

  • What influences your decisions?
  • What does the past have to do with decisions made today?
  • How far reaching are the impacts of decisions? (i.e. community, province, nation, world, universe)
  • Do all problems have a solution?
  • Can all problems be solved the same way? What steps (model) do you use in order to solve a problem?
  • What does the affirmation of diversity add to the Canadian culture?
Essential Questions are open-ended questions that are continually revisited, encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study, form the evidence of understanding and frame the assessment at the end of the study.

CURRICULUM OUTCOMES AND INDICATORS

Outcomes: Student Friendly Outcomes
DR4.2
Explain the relationship of First Nations and Métis peoples with the land. : Tell how the First Nations and Métis people lived off the land.
Indicators:

  • Investigate the traditional worldviews of First Nations peoples prior to European contact regarding land as an animate object and sustaining life force.
  • Research traditional lifestyles of First Nations communities and peoples prior to European contact (e.g., hunting, gathering, movement of people to follow food sources).
  • Explore how the traditional worldviews and teachings of First Nations’ Elders regarding land influence the lifestyle of First Nations people today.
  • Research the history of the Métis people and their relationship with the land.
  • Compare the traditional views of land and culture of the Indigenous people of Saskatchewan with those of the railway developers.
  • Assess the impact of historic loss of land on First Nations and Métis people.
  • Investigate the process by which decisions were made about the location of reserve lands in Saskatchewan.
  • Research the Métis struggle for land, and the displacement of Métis people in the late 19th century.

DR4.1
Correlate the impact of the land on the lifestyles and settlement patterns of the people of Saskatchewan.
Indicators:

  • Locate Saskatchewan on a map of Canada, North America, and the world.
  • Locate the geographic centre of Saskatchewan on a map.
  • Make inferences about why people in Saskatchewan settled in particular locations, including settlement patterns before and after coming together of First Nations and European peoples using a variety of maps (e.g., near waterways, sources of water, rail lines, natural resources, low population density in rural areas).
  • Identify the characteristics of the unique geographic regions in Saskatchewan.
  • Identify the impact of geography on the architecture of Saskatchewan, including how styles, materials, and cultural traditions have been affected by interaction with the land and other people in the province.
  • Analyze the influence of geography on the lifestyle of people living in Saskatchewan (e.g., flora and fauna, pastimes, transportation, cost of food, type of food, occupations, availability of services such as education and health care).
  • Conduct an inquiry investigating how residents of Saskatchewan came to occupy the land that is now our province (e.g., First Nations, early Europeans, and Métis).

IN4.2
Describe the origins of the cultural diversity in Saskatchewan communities. Describe the roots of Saskatchewan cultures. Describe the different cultures of Saskatchewan and understand how working together was necessary for survival.
Indicators:

  • Identify the traditional locations of the various First Nations tribes and language groupings in Saskatchewan prior to European contact.
  • Detail the ways in which First Nations peoples supported the survival of early European newcomers to Saskatchewan.
  • Trace and represent the history of European immigration to Saskatchewan including those who came for economic reasons (explorers, fur traders, homestead farmers) and religious reasons (Mennonites, Hutterites, Doukhobours).
  • Articulate reasons why European immigrants left their homelands and settled in Saskatchewan, with particular emphasis upon the local community and/or the individual student families.
  • Represent through speaking, writing, drama, multimedia, or other form, the challenges faced, both historically and in the current era, by First Nations people, Métis people, and immigrants to Saskatchewan.
  • Identify strategies by which diverse cultural communities in Saskatchewan learned to work together for the common good (e.g., agricultural fairs, service organizations, community celebrations, arts groups, barn raising, construction of community facilities).
  • Compare immigration patterns in Saskatchewan in the 19th and early 20th centuries to immigration patterns in the current era.
  • Identify the significance of historic buildings and places associated with cultural diversity in the community and province.
  • Investigate the role of archaeology in understanding the origins of Saskatchewan communities.

DR4.3
Analyze the implications of the Treaty relationship in Saskatchewan: Understand the factors that impacted the making of Treaties in Saskatchewan.
Indicators:

  • Locate Treaty areas within Saskatchewan and locate reserves within the Treaty area of the school.
  • Investigate conditions that precipitated Treaty negotiations in Saskatchewan.
  • Research Treaty provisions, including the spirit and intent of Treaties as well as material considerations.
  • Assess the benefits of Treaties to all Saskatchewan people.

TEACHER BACKGROUND

Settlement of Saskatchewan

  • History
  • Ethnicity of immigrants and locations settled
  • Government policies that promoted immigration

Treaty Areas of Saskatchewan

  • Treaty map
  • Treaty background

Part B: Learning Plan

In this inquiry students will learn about:

  • the different cultures that make up Saskatchewan and learn how settlers/people overcame obstacles posed by the environment by working together;
  • the lives of the First Nations and Métis in Saskatchewan and study their connection to the land prior to European contact; and,
  • the impact of geography and history on the decisions made by all people who chose to live in Saskatchewan specifically reflecting upon the impact of decision making to the making of Treaties.

QUESTIONS TO GUIDE INQUIRY

Essential Questions – Guiding Questions:

  • What does the affirmation of diversity add to the Canadian culture?
    • Does diversity strengthen or weaken us?
    • What is needed to develop respect for diversity in Canada?
    • How do we celebrate diversity in our school, community, province?
  • What influences your decisions?
    • What does the past have to do with decisions made today?
    • How far reaching are the impacts of decisions? (i.e. Community, province, nation, world, universe)
  • Do all problems have a solution?
    • What makes a solution “good/high quality”?
  • Can all problems be solved the same way?
    • What steps (model) do you use in order to solve a problem?
  • Why do all Canadians have an investment in treaty relationships?
    • What are the benefits of understanding treaty promises?
    • What are the hazards of not understanding treaty promises?

CONNECT TO TOPIC AND SURFACE STUDENTS’ THINKING ABOUT …

This section indicates ways to introduce the lesson by engaging students and helping them to personally connect to the content. Essential questions are posed here and vocabulary is noted here. Answers to essential questions establish a baseline regarding student understanding as they identify the basic knowledge that students have and give teachers an idea of what students will need to learn to explore these outcomes.
Process

  • Pose the essential and guiding questions and allow students to discuss their thoughts on the matter.
  • Determine what the students know, understand, need to be able to do to master/answer the essential questions (connect to content). Additional guiding questions can be added as required. Students are encouraged to add their questions to the others.
  • Create Know, Want to know, Learned Chart – identify vocabulary that requires development
  • Surface any additional questions students might have as a result of their discussions about the essential questions.
Discuss with students. Post their initial reflections for later review to note thinking changes. Have students begin to research the answers to the following or choose to teach this information to students.

Post Saskatchewan’s Motto
“From Many Peoples Strength”.

  • What does this motto mean?
  • Why would Saskatchewan choose this motto?
  • Is it an appropriate motto for Saskatchewan?

History of Saskatchewan/Settling of Saskatchewan

  • How old is Saskatchewan?/When did Saskatchewan begin to be settled?
  • When European settlers came to Saskatchewan who was living here?
  • What do you know about the people who first lived in Saskatchewan?
  • Did any of your relatives move from a European country to live in Saskatchewan?
  • When people came to Saskatchewan, what were they looking for, where did they settle?
  • How did the people who lived here survive?
    • Develop a list and post – Who Came? Why? – this will form a starting point for the groups that students will research
    • Create Know, Want to know, Learned Chart

First Nations living in Saskatchewan

  • In which treaty area is this school located?
  • What are the First Nation communities within this treaty area?
  • What is the language of the First Nations in those areas?
  • What are the adjoining Treaty areas and who are the First Nations living within each area?
  • What is the history of the First Nations in each area?
    • When did First Nations people begin living here?
    • What were their traditional traveling patterns?
    • How were they connected with the land?
    • How did they survive?
  • What questions would students ask of first people to live in Saskatchewan?

Post any additional questions students have about how the province of Saskatchewan was settled and the First Nations who lived here prior to the arrival of the settlers. These questions can be used as additional frames for the research by the students.

Understanding geographic areas of Sask.
Use a map of Saskatchewan to:

  • Chart the locations of the treaty lands and understand the supports First Nations provided to immigrants to Sask.
  • Indicate some of the areas where immigrants settled.
  • Develop connections between geographic location and economic opportunities for immigrants/new Canadians and settlement.

Timeline Framework Reference – developing historical perspective on decision-making

  • Begin to develop a timeline beginning in the 1600’s and ending shortly after Saskatchewan became a province – 1905 – 1950.
  • Roughly frame the timeline into half centuries – 1600 – 1650, 1700 – 1750, 1800 – 1850, 1900 – 1950 ~ 8 sections.
  • Mark the creation of the province of Saskatchewan 1905.
DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson. It describes the main activity(ies) involved. In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that students make of the essential questions. It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities.
Jigsaw Study Process

  • Divide the class into groups and give each group a demographic group of people to learn about and present to the class.
  • Each group must find out the information in the questions posed and additional questions raised by students so they can share with the class.
  • Encourage students to present information learned in a variety of modes including speaking, writing, drama, multimedia, or other modes so that all students have an entrance point for demonstrating their leaning and understanding.
  • Consider “resident experts”, people in the community that can be invited into the classroom to speak with students.
Groups of people who founded Saskatchewan

  • First Nations in the Treaty Area where the school is located
  • Métis Nation
  • European immigrants
    • Explorers
    • Fur traders
    • Homestead Farmers
    • Religious reasons – Mennonites, Hutterites, Doukhobours

Specific Information Required

Trace and represent the history of the people studied. For each group – Identify:

  • History
    • Place or country of origin
    • Where, when and why came to Saskatchewan – reference on map and timeline
    • Worldview or belief system of people
  • Relationship to the land
    • How they lived on and used the land, traditional lifestyles
  • Why they chose area of Saskatchewan to settle – how did geography impact decisions
  • Overcoming Challenges
    • Difficulties faced and how solved i.e. working together, forming treaties
    • Decision and Impact of decisions made to deal with situations/challenges/hardships?

Summarizing and Inferencing – in groups have students indicate

  • What are students noticing? Commonalities – Differences between groups studied?
  • What were the influences to the decisions made? i.e.
    • Why did people choose to live where they lived?
    • Geography and the way people chose to make a living?
    • How did worldview/belief system influence decisions made?
  • What are the big ideas that are surfacing?
    • Geography impacted settlements
    • Worldview impacted use of land
    • All groups of people ran into difficulty and needed support to survive
 

Post Saskatchewan’s Motto “From Many Peoples Strength”. Have students consider their earlier answers to the questions and reflect on:

How their thinking has changed?

  • What does the motto mean?
  • Why would Saskatchewan choose this motto?
  • Is it an appropriate motto for Saskatchewan?

APPLY AND EXTEND KNOWLEDGE

This section includes ideas to extend the inquiry or apply concepts explored. This section may also includea dditional reflective questions to promote student connection to the topic. This forms the “You do” section of the inquiry – may be “you do it collaboratively” or “you do it alone”. Invite students to extend their thinking beyond the classroom discussions and inquiry experiences. Pose additional reflective questions that have been raised to encourage critical and creative thinking.

This next area of study will make links between the treaties formed and specifically addresses the outcome that asks students to analyze the implications of the Treaty relationship in Saskatchewan.

Essential Questions
Decision-Making/Problem-solving

  • What influences your decisions?
  • How does history impact decisions?
  • Do all problems have a solution?
  • What makes a solution “good/high quality”?
  • Why do all Canadians have an investment in treaty relationships?
    • What are the benefits of understanding treaty promises?
    • What are the hazards of not understanding treaty promises?
  • If a rule/law impacts people differently, is it fair? Explain your thinking.
  • What influenced the decision of First Nations people and the British Crown to enter into treaties?
  • How did worldview impact the understanding of the provision of treaties?
  • Who benefited from treaties and how?
  • Was the treaty solution a “good/high quality” decision? Explain your thinking.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding. Ideal demonstrations will be in authentic performance tasks. Each citizenship study may have its own smaller assessment piece or be compiled to supportone larger performance task assessment. Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways. Demonstrations of understanding may be done collaboratively or independently.
Link back to Essential Questions
Cultural Diversity

  • How did diversity strengthen Saskatchewan?
  • How does it continue to strengthen Saskatchewan?
  • What does the affirmation of diversity add to the Saskatchewan/Canadian culture?
  • How would you rate the present culture and respect for diversity in Saskatchewan? Why? What is needed to increase the respect for diversity in Saskatchewan?

Decision-Making/Problem-solving

  • What influences your decisions?
  • How does history impact decisions?
  • Do all problems have a solution?
  • What makes a solution “good/high quality”?
  • Why are treaty relationships important to all Canadians?
    • What are the benefits of understanding treaty promises?
    • What are the hazards of not understanding treaty promises?

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES

Students are keeping a Citizenship Journal to reflect upon their developing views of citizenship.  This section provides prompts for student journals.  Students are invited to choose one that interests them or propose their own. Students can also respond to any of the essential questions.

Students are encouraged to respond using a variety of genres.

Canada is country that values diversity.

  • What are your responsibilities as a citizen to understand and affirm that diversity?
  • What are the costs of not affirming diversity?

Part C: Lifelong Learning Citizens Resources

LESSON RESOURCES

CROSS CURRICULAR CONNECTIONS

Language Arts

  • Themes
    • Social, Cultural, and Historical: Students will:
      • examine the relationships with others, their community, and the world
      • consider the social and historical context
      • explore their connections in families, schools, groups, and communities and to understand the diverse needs and wants of others
      • show concern for other people in their relationships, groups, and communities.
    • Environmental and Technological: Students will:
      • explore the elements of the natural and constructed worlds and the role of technology and related developments in their society
      • explore the needs and characteristics of living things; properties of objects and materials; the five senses; and daily seasonal changes.
    • Personal and Philosophical: Students will:
      • believe in their own self-worth and to feel that they have control over the things that happen to them
      • focus on self-image and self-esteem
      • reflect on self and life, and on their beliefs and values and those of their society.

Treaty Education

  • TR4: Analyze how relationships are affected when treaty promises are kept or broken.
  • HC4: Explore the historical reasons why people entered into treaty.
  • TPP4: Examine the objectives of the First Nations and British Crown’s representatives in negotiating treaty.
  • SI4: Examine the intent of treaty in relation to education.

Health

  • USC4.3: Examine healthy interpersonal skills and determine strategies to effectively develop new relationships and/or negotiate disagreements in relationships
  • USC4.4: Determine basic personal responsibility for safety and protection in various environments/situations
  • USC4.5: Examine how identity (i.e., self-concept, self-esteem, self-determination) is influenced by relationships that are formed with others.
  • DM4.1: Investigate the importance of personal responsibility and communication in making informed decisions related to healthy eating and physical activity, prevention/ management of health challenges, negotiating disagreements, safety and protection, personal identity, and stressors.

Science

Life Science: Habitats and Communities (HC)

  • HC4.1 Investigate the interdependence of plants and animals, including humans, within habitats and communities. [CP, SI]
  • HC4.3 Assess the effects of natural and human activities on habitats and communities, and propose actions to maintain or restore habitats. [CP, DM]
  • Earth and Space Science: Rocks, Minerals, and Erosion (RM)
  • RM4.2 Assess how human uses of rocks and minerals impact self, society, and the environment. [DM]
  • RM4.3 Analyze how weathering, erosion, and fossils provide evidence to support human understanding of the formation of landforms on Earth. [CP, SI, TPS]

FURTHER INVESTIGATION SUGGESTIONS

  • Student created assembly showcasing diversity in our school/community, presentation highlighting school rules and the need for them, share knowledge of treaty relationships with care partners, interview local governance (mayor, chief, principal, etc)
  • Organize a petition
  • Contact an elected official, band office about an issue for which you have questions
  • Become a student representative
  • Volunteer at your city councilors office, band office, mayors
  • Lobby governments
  • Choose a current issue for which you have suggested alternatives, make a plan for action and follow through
  • Critically examine a rule/law. Do you support it or feel it needs to be changed?
  • How can you be an advocate for change? What type of impact would that have on yourself, school, community, province?
  • How can you support/empower someone/group who is negatively affected by a rule/law?
  • Have students develop a pro/con list of challenging or changing a rule in school, community, local law, etc.

GRADE 4 CITIZENSHIP STUDIES SELF, COMMUNITY, AND PLACE

Part A: Curricular Connections and Background

BROAD AREA OF CITIZENSHIP

Citizens with a Strong Sense of Self, Community, and Place examine and investigate their connectedness to school, community, and the natural environment. They do this by reflecting upon the choices they make and the impact of those choices on self and others, their school, their community both near and far, and their place. Being a member of any community brings with it certain rights; however, it also brings with it certain responsibilities to protect those rights and privileges. Students are learning to value their connection as individuals and members of a community to its place and reflect upon their actions in maintaining and nurturing the relationships between these three components of their environment.

OVERVIEW AND DESIRED RESULTS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

A person’s “sense of place” develops through experience and knowledge of the history, geography and geology of an area, the legends of a place, and a sense of the land and its history after living there for a time. Developing a sense of place helps students identify with their region and with each other. A strong sense of place can lead to more sensitive stewardship of our cultural history and natural environment.
In this section, students will learn about the choices made and the strategies used by Saskatchewan people to deal with the challenges posed by the environment. They will learn about the choices that First Nations and the Métis people made to live in connection with the land. Finally students will examine the choices of Saskatchewan people, their use of resources and technologies and consider the impact they have had on communities at the local, national, and global level. Study will include the analysis of the contributions of First Nations and Métis people to the province, historically and currently.

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS OF CITIZENSHIP STUDY

Students will use information to understand that:

  • Decision-making is a complex process with far-reaching impacts and is influenced by history.
  • A person’s worldview frames their understanding of the world.
  • Citizens value the need of the collective common good and consider how their actions impact the collective well-being.
  • Governments and the people who elect them are responsible to one another.
  • Empathy and respect for diversity in cultural and social groups help strengthen one’s community and requires appreciation of different perspectives.
  • Individuals have the power to affect others and make a difference.
  • Canada has a long relationship with First Nations Peoples through treaty relationships.
  • Canada has a constitutional responsibility to support First Nation, Métis and Inuit people.
  • Societies create rules, written and unwritten, to promote order that lead to inclusion or exclusion and are enforced by social behaviours and expectations.
  • Belonging requires participation and is a fundamental right of all citizens.
  • Active citizens become engaged in discussions, negotiations, debates and consider action regarding Canadian issues.

Inferences to make:

  • Positive collective action enhances self-esteem
  • Empathy means understanding and appreciating another person’s perspective and acting in an appropriate manner(i.e. Stop teasing when its gone too far)
  • Societies create rules, written and unwritten, to promote order that lead to inclusion or exclusion and are enforced by social behaviours and expectations.
  • Enduring understandings and questions stimulate thinking, guide the inquiry and are linked to outcomes.
  • They point to the “big ideas” in the area of inquiry and should be considered and reconsidered as the inquiry progresses.
  • Answers to these questions form the evidence of learning at the end of study.

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT

Students will:

  • Develop skills for treating self and others with respect
  • Demonstrate empathy in social situations
  • Continually reassess where they belong (changing contexts/roles and expectations) i.e. school, family, community
  • Reflect upon the impact of their choices

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

  • How do you control the impact of your actions/decisions?
  • What responsibility do you have to balance personal needs with the community’s needs?
  • What is the power and responsibility of the individual to can make a difference in the world.
  • What are the rules for belonging and how are they developed and enforced?
  • How does empathy contribute to citizenship?
Essential Questions are open-ended questions that are continually revisited, encompass concepts that students will explore throughout the unit of study, form the evidence of understanding and frame the assessment at the end of the study.

CURRICULUM OUTCOMES AND INDICATORS

Outcomes: (Sask. Curriculum/Student Friendly)
RW4.1
Analyze the strategies Saskatchewan people have developed to meet the challenges presented by the natural environment. Students examine the ways Saskatchewan people dealt with the difficulties/challenges of the environment.
Indicators:

  • List the challenges and opportunities climate presents for residents of Saskatchewan
  • Retell the stories of Elders, traditional knowledge keepers, and senior citizens about surviving weather extremes (e.g., drought, cold, blizzards, tornadoes, extreme heat).
  • Collect the natural weather forecasting techniques of Elders, traditional knowledge keepers, senior citizens, and others with local knowledge.
  • Represent the traditions and practices Saskatchewan people developed when faced with isolation, including First Nations practices adopted by Europeans.
  • Research past and present technologies used to withstand the Saskatchewan climate.
  • Investigate the practice of river lot farming introduced in Saskatchewan by Métis people.
  • Investigate the technological evolution of farming practices in Saskatchewan, including crop variety development, pesticide and herbicide use, and soil and water conservation.
  • Graph the typical energy consumption in Saskatchewan for an average year, and investigate energy efficient technologies being developed in Saskatchewan

RW4.3
Assess the impact of Saskatchewan resources and technological innovations on the provincial, national, and global communities: Students will examine Saskatchewan Resources and technologies and how they have impacted communities at the local, national, and global level.
Indicators:

  • Identify the natural resources and industries found in the local community, and analyze their impact upon the community.
  • Examine the environmental impact of the development of natural resources on the local community, the province, and the world.
  • Describe the impact of technological innovations originating in Saskatchewan on the global community (e.g., farm machinery, varieties of grain, automated teller machines, fibre optics, communications technologies, pesticides and herbicides, vaccines).
  • Represent on a map the major resources in Saskatchewan (e.g., minerals, potash, oil, uranium, natural gas, lumber, water, crop and livestock production).
  • Locate on a map the major industries in Saskatchewan (e.g., agriculture processing, mining, manufacturing, forestry products, energy refinement, tourism, livestock production).
  • Identify the natural resources and industries found in the local community, and analyze their impact upon the community.
  • Illustrate the goods made from the major natural resources, the consumers of those goods, and the export destinations.
  • Differentiate between primary and secondary industry.
  • Examine the environmental impact of the development of natural resources on the local community, the province, and the world.
  • Describe the impact of technological innovations originating in Saskatchewan on the global community (e.g., farm machinery, varieties of grain, automated teller machines, fibre optics, communications technologies, pesticides and herbicides, vaccines).

IN4.1
Analyze how First Nations and Métis people have shaped and continue to shape Saskatchewan: Describe the contributions to Saskatchewan by First Nations and Métis people.
Indicators:

  • Create biographic profiles of a selection of Saskatchewan First Nations and Métis leaders in the time period prior to Saskatchewan joining Confederation (e.g., Poundmaker, Big Bear, Riel, Dumont, Almighty Voice, Whitecap, Charles “Wapass” Trottier).
  • Create an inventory of the contributions of First Nations and Métis people to government, business, and professional life in Saskatchewan (e.g., consulting firms, outfitters, financial firms, architects, educators, health workers, legal specialists, artists, athletes). (eg., Jim Brady, Jim Sinclair, Dr. Howard Adams, Donald Worm, Leanne Bellegarde, Dr. Lee Wilson, Freddie Sasakamoose, Clarence Campeau, Police Chief Troy Cooper.)
  • Explain the significance of dance and music to First Nations and Métis peoples and its contribution to Saskatchewan intercultural development.
  • Illustrate the contributions of First Nations and Métis artists, sculptors, musicians, dancers, storytellers and writers to Saskatchewan culture (e.g., Buffy Sainte-Marie, Allan Sapp, David Bouchard, John Arcand, Michael Lonechild, Henry Beaudry, Andrea Menard, Angelique Merasty, Donny Parenteau, John Lagimodiere).

IN4.3
Determine the influence Saskatchewan people and programs have had on a national scale: Tell/show how Saskatchewan people have influenced Canada.
Indicators:

  • Identify the impact of programs originating in Saskatchewan on Canada and global communities (e.g., Medicare, welfare, cooperative movement, the Saskatchewan Bill of Rights).
  • Represent the accomplishments of prominent Saskatchewan people whose contributions in their field are nationally or internationally recognized in a gallery, media clips, vignettes, or other media.
  • Investigate the value of volunteerism in various local community organizations and activities.

TEACHER BACKGROUND

Saskatchewan Achievements

  • Programs
    • Medicare, welfare
    • Cooperative movement
    • Saskatchewan Bill of Rights
  • Technologies and Inventions
    • Cobalt Cancer Treatment
    • ATM Machines
    • Farming Technologies
    • Fibre optics

Notable Saskatchewan People

  • Political
    • Premiers
    • First Nations Leaders – Poundmaker, Big Bear, Almighty Voice, David Ahenakew, Noel Starblanket, Perry Bellegarde
    • Métis Leaders – Louis Riel, Gabriel Dumont, Jim Brady, Jim Sinclair, Clement Chartier, Clarence Trotchie
  • Business
    • Gary Merasty
    • Leanne Bellegarde,
    • Gabrielle Scrimshaw
  • Artists, sculptors, writers

Part B: Learning Plan

In this inquiry students will:

  • Learn about the challenges the environment created for the people of Saskatchewan
  • Learn about the contributions of First Nations and Métis people to the province of Saskatchewan
  • Learn about the contributions of the people of Saskatchewan to Canada
  • Learn about the impact to communities locally, nationally and globally of Saskatchewan Resources and technologies

QUESTIONS TO GUIDE INQUIRY

Essential Questions: Guiding Questions

  • How do you control the impact of your actions/decisions?
    • Can you control the ripple effect of your decisions or choices?
  • What responsibility do you have to balance personal needs with the community’s needs?
    • Why do you have to care about your communities’ needs and not just your own?
    • What would it require to ensure that the needs of all people are met, all around the world?
  • What is the power and responsibility of the individual to make a difference in the world?
    • Can you affect the world in a positive way?
    • In what ways can you start to make a difference in your own community?
    • How can you use that knowledge to make a difference in the world? With others?
  • What are the rules for belonging and how are they developed and enforced?
  • How does empathy contribute to citizenship?
    • Why is empathy important? How can we put ourselves in someone else’s “shoes”?

CONNECT TO TOPIC AND SURFACE STUDENTS’ THINKING ABOUT …

This section introduces the concepts and helps teachers gain an understanding of the current thinking of the class. Present essential questions and allow students to think about and talk about. Student answers will give teachers a baseline or beginning understanding of the amount of specific and incidental teaching required to explore these outcomes. Vocabulary is introduced and noted here. This section frames the “We do” portion of the lesson where teachers guide the initial structure of the inquiry.
Process

  • Pose the essential and guiding questions and allow students to discuss their thoughts on the matter.
  • Determine what the students know, understand, need to be able to do to master/answer the essential questions (connect to content). Additional guiding questions can be added as required. Students are encouraged to add their questions to the others.
  • Create Know, Want to know, Learned Chart – identify vocabulary that requires development
  • Surface any additional questions students might have as a result of their discussions about the essential questions.
Surface and post student ideas for later reflection.

  • What does “Necessity is the mother of invention” mean?
  • How does the phrase “bread basket of the world” apply to Saskatchewan?
  • What is the province of Saskatchewan known for? What makes it special?
  • What are the natural resources of Saskatchewan?
  • Who are the leaders/people of Saskatchewan who are well known?
  • How does Saskatchewan contribute to the country, the world?

Weather Records for Saskatchewan
The people who live in Saskatchewan are very proud of their ability to withstand some notable weather records. Here are some events recorded in Saskatchewan.

  • Highest temperature ever recorded in Saskatchewan= Yellow Grass and Midale on July 5, 1937 – 45.0°C.
  • Lowest temperature ever recorded – Prince Albert – 56.7°C, February 1, 1893
  • Windiest day was October 4, 1976 in Melfort – maximum hourly wind speeds reached 142 km/hr.
  • Teachers can check out more interesting weather facts at:
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/saskatchewan-top-ten-weather-1.4184186
  • Most rainfall recorded Vanguard, July 3, 2000 – 375 mm of rain in an eight hour period
  • How do you suppose the First Nations, Métis and early settlers survived these extremes in temperatures?
  • How do we survive these weather conditions now?
  • Post student answers, grouping into past and present. Look for similarities and differences. What themes are surfacing?
DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING
This section is the core of the lesson.  It describes the main activity(ies) involved.  In inquiry-based learning, the teacher facilitates the activities that lead to the understandings that students make of the essential questions.  It is critical then, that students be allowed to raise questions and talk about issues that develop as they explore the learning activities.
Jigsaw Study Process

  • Divide the class into groups and give each group a demographic group of people to learn about and present to the class.
  • Each group must find out the information in the questions posed and additional questions raised by students so they can share with the class.
  • Encourage students to present information learned in a variety of modes including speaking, writing, drama, multimedia, or other modes so that all students have an entrance point for demonstrating their leaning and understanding.
  • Consider “resident experts”, people in the community that can be invited into the classroom to speak with students.

INQUIRY 1 – DEALING WITH SASKATCHEWAN CHALLENGES

Three groups of people who have contributed to the development of the province of Saskatchewan are:

i) First Nations
ii) European settlers (French, English, Slavic, etc.)
iii) Métis

For each group of people learn about the following:

Environmental Challenges

  • How did each group:
    • predict or forecast the weather?
    • deal with weather extremes? What did they use to protect themselves?
  • What traditions and practices did they develop and share to deal with isolation?
  • Tell a story about surviving weather extremes.
  • How did they find food?
    • The environment created conditions that caused people to make choices about how they would get and store food, i.e. use of land, following food sources, etc. Identify these decisions and the practices that resulted from those decisions.
Summarizing and Inferencing… Pulling it all together

  • What are the commonalities and differences in practices and techniques dealing with the environment?
  • How well did each group do? Who else did they have to depend on?
  • How did diversity support survival in Saskatchewan?/What role did diversity play in supporting survival in Saskatchewan?

Connect back to the essential questions.

  • What were the impacts of each group’s decisions? What were the ripple effects?
  • What responsibilities did individuals have to balance their needs with the community’s needs?
  • What was the responsibility of the group to use their power to make a difference?
  • How were other groups included or excluded?
  • How did empathy contribute to the decisions made?
  • What are the big ideas that students are seeing?

Post student thinking for later reflection.

INQUIRY 2 – THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SASKATCHEWAN PEOPLE AND THE LAND

Citizens with a sense of self, community, and place consider their “footprint” and impact of developing and using those resources. The impacts are felt locally in the communities and extend nationally and globally. In the next area of study, students will research the impact of using the land and resources to make a living.

A. Natural Resources
Local

  • Identify the natural resources and industries found in the local community.
  • What is their impact upon the community?
    • How are they used by the community?
    • Who benefits from their use?
    • How do they contribute to the community?

Provincial

  • Have each group of students choose one of the following resources to research and present to the class.
    • minerals, potash, oil, uranium, natural gas, lumber, water, crop and livestock production
  • Identify on a map where they are located.
  • What is the environmental impact of the development of the resources on the:
    • local community,
    • the province, and
    • the world.
  • Who uses these resources and for what?
    • Show where the customers or users of the resource are located.

B. Industries

  • Have each group of students choose one of the following industries to research and present to the class.
    • agriculture processing, mining, manufacturing, forestry products, energy refinement, tourism, livestock production
  • Identify the location of the industries in Saskatchewan.
  • Tell whether it is a primary or secondary industry.
  • Identify the goods made from the industry.
    • Who uses/consumes these goods?
    • Where are the goods exported or sent to?

C. Land Use
What were the different worldviews of how the land should be used by the people of Saskatchewan?

  • Have each group of students choose one of the following groups of people to research and present to the class.
    • First Nations (Choose the Nations from your Treaty area), Métis, Railway Developers, Settlers
  • What was the traditional worldview of your group regarding the use of land?
    • What did they use the land for?
    • How did they use/protect the land?
    • What did they think of the land?
    • Where did they get their ideas of land use from? i.e. Elders, history
  • How is the view of land seen in the lifestyle of your group in the present?
  • Research the history of the Métis people and their relationship with the land.

Vocabulary

  • natural resources
  • industry
  • economy
  • inventive
  • resilience
  • environmental footprint
  • primary industry
  • secondary industry
  • empathy
Summarizing and Inferencing… Pulling it all together

  • What are the commonalities and differences in practices and techniques in using the resources and land of the province?
  • How responsible has the province of Saskatchewan been in their decisions to use the resources?
  • What are the big ideas that students are seeing?

Connect back to the essential questions.

  • What were the impacts of each group’s decisions? What were the ripple effects?
  • What responsibilities did students see in trying to balance individual needs with the community’s needs?
  • What was the responsibility of the group to use their power to make a difference?
  • How were other groups included or excluded?
  • How did empathy contribute to the decisions made?
  • What are the big ideas that students are seeing?
  • Post student answers for reflection. Compare answers from the different inquiries.
  • What similarities are arising?
  • What themes are students noticing?

INQUIRY 3 – CONTRIBUTIONS BY THE PEOPLE OF SASKATCHEWAN TO THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY

What contributions has Saskatchewan made to the world?

Citizens have a responsibility to contribute to their local community, province, and beyond. This final inquiry will examine the contributions of all Saskatchewan people, including First Nations and Métis people to the province of Saskatchewan, to Canada, including the areas of programming, science and technologies, and artistic community including all aspects of the arts.

As a group, have the class think about… talk about… how the following groups of people contribute to the province.

  • What are some specific contributions of Saskatchewan people to the world?
  • For each innovation or contribution:
    • Describe why it is significant or important
    • Who it has impacted
    • Who invented it and why (What problem were they trying to fix?)

Technological Innovations

  • From the following inventory, have students choose one innovation to research and present to the class.
    • farm machinery, varieties of grain, automated teller machines, fibre optics, communications technologies, pesticides and herbicides, vaccines
  • Program innovations
    • Medicare, welfare, cooperative movement, the Saskatchewan Bill of Rights

Art and Culture

  • Illustrate the contributions of artists, sculptors, musicians, dancers, storytellers and writers to Saskatchewan culture. Have students choose one artist to research and present to the class.
  • Have students brainstorm a list of contributors to Saskatchewan culture. Include:
    • Buffy Sainte-Marie, Allan Sapp, David Bouchard, Michael Lonechild, Henry Beaudry, Rita Bouvier, Andrea Menard, Angelique Merasty, Joni Mitchell, W.O. Mitchell, Joseph Naytowhow (others?) John Arcand, Donny Parenteau, John Lagimodiere
  • Explain the significance of their contribution to the culture of Saskatchewan
Summarizing and Inferencing… Pulling it all together

  • What are the commonalities and differences of the contributions of the people of the province of Saskatchewan to the larger community?
  • How would you rate the people of the province of Saskatchewan in their role as Citizens with a sense of their impact on self, community, and place. What suggestions do you have for improvement?
  • What are the big ideas that students are seeing?

APPLY AND EXTEND KNOWLEDGE

This section includes ideas to extend the inquiry and apply concepts explored. This section may also include additional reflective questions to promote student connection to the topic. Reflective questions encourage critical and creative thinking.
Throughout this study, students are asked to consider the impact of decisions on people and the environment. Decisions were made regarding land use and ownership that had significant impact on First Nations and Métis people. Teachers may choose to invite resident experts into the class to give their perspectives on the following questions or present information to students and then have them reflect on the information using these questions.

  • How were decisions made about the location of reserve lands in Saskatchewan?
    • Who was involved in the consultation?
    • Who made the final decision?
  • What has been the history of the Métis struggle for land in Saskatchewan?
    • What were the reasons for the displacement of Métis people in the late 19th century?
    • Describe the issues and the impact.
  • What has been the impact of historic loss of land on First Nations and Métis people?
  • Rate the decisions made by the government of the day, identify the pros and cons and suggest alternate actions.
  • What themes are students noticing?
  • Why is it important to know this information?

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

This section suggests ways in which students may demonstrate their understanding. Ideal demonstrations will be in authentic performance tasks. Each citizenship study may have its own smaller assessment piece or be compiled to supportone larger performance task assessment. Assessment pieces vary, but should allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways. Demonstrations of understanding may be done collaboratively or independently.
In groups have students think about… talk about… their thinking with respect to these essential questions and possible answers. Surface any areas of particular interest or concern for the students. Compare earlier thinking with current thinking.

What did you learn about:

  • How well you control the impact of your actions/decisions?
    • How much control do you have over the ripple effect of decisions?
  • What choices did you see people making in trying to balance their personal needs with the needs of the community?
    • What do those choices tell you about how responsible people felt about their decisions?
  • What examples can you find of people or individuals trying to make a difference in the world?
    • What impact did they have?
    • Would you say they were successful, why or why not?
    • What does their story tell you about the responsibility they felt for their decisions?
  • What examples did you see of people trying to make people feel included? Excluded?
  • How does empathy contribute to those decisions?

 

Their thinking with respect to these questions and possible answers. Surface any areas of particular interest or concern for the students.

In teams have students develop a response to the following:

Citizens with a strong sense of Self, Community, and Place reflect upon their decisions and actions as they relate to their world. You have learned about the challenges faced by the people of the province, learned how the land and resources are used, and reflected upon

the contributions made by the people of the province to the country and nationally.

If the province of Saskatchewan were a citizen what kind of rating would it receive as a citizen who demonstrates the principles of strong sense of self, community, and place? What are its strengths? What are the group’s suggestions for opportunities to improve? Explain your thinking and provide evidence to support your views.

Explore rubric options demonstrating understanding for assessment guidelines.

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES

Students are keeping a Citizenship Journal to reflect upon their developing views of citizenship.  This section provides prompts for student journals.  Students are invited to choose one that interests them or propose their own. Students can also respond to any of the essential questions.

Students are encouraged to respond using a variety of genres.

  • Is it important to work towards a sense of belonging? What benefits would you see in your community, province?
  • What are the pros and cons of a collective knowledge bank?
  • Saskatchewan people are known for their inventiveness and resilience. What have you learned about the people of Saskatchewan as a result of your studies? How have they contributed to a better country? How will you contribute to a better country?

Part C: Self, Community, and Place Resources

LESSON RESOURCES

CROSS CURRICULAR CONNECTIONS

Language Arts

  • Themes
    • Social, Cultural, and Historical: Students will:
      • examine the relationships with others, their community, and the world
      • consider the social and historical context
      • explore their connections in families, schools, groups, and communities and to understand the diverse needs and wants of others
      • show concern for other people in their relationships, groups, and communities.
    • Environmental and Technological: Students will:
      • explore the elements of the natural and constructed worlds and the role of technology and related developments in their society
      • explore the needs and characteristics of living things; properties of objects and materials; the five senses; and daily seasonal changes.
    • Personal and Philosophical: Students will:
      • believe in their own self-worth and to feel that they have control over the things that happen to them
      • focus on self-image and self-esteem
      • reflect on self and life, and on their beliefs and values and those of their society.
    • Communicative: Students will:
      • consider the role of communication in their lives and the technologies and strategies that help people become effective communicators.
      • practice the skills to interact effectively with others.

Treaty Education

  • TR4: Analyze how relationships are affected when treaty promises are kept or broken.
  • HC4: Explore the historical reasons why people entered into treaty.
  • TPP4: Examine the objectives of the First Nations and British Crown’s representatives in negotiating treaty.

Health

Understanding, Skills, and Confidences

  • USC4.3: Examine healthy interpersonal skills and determine strategies to effectively develop new relationships and/or negotiate disagreements in relationships
  • USC4.4: Determine basic personal responsibility for safety and protection in various environments/situations
  • USC4.5: Examine how identity (i.e., self-concept, self-esteem, self-determination) is influenced by relationships that are formed with others.

Decision Making

  • DM4.1: Investigate the importance of personal responsibility and communication in making informed decisions related to healthy eating and physical activity, prevention/ management of health challenges, negotiating disagreements, safety and protection, personal identity, and stressors.

Action Planning

  • AP4.1: Design and apply, with guidance, two four-day action plans that require communication related to healthy eating and physical activity, prevention/ management of health challenges, negotiating disagreements, safety and protection, personal identity, and stressors.

Science

Life Science: Habitats and Communities (HC)

  • HC4.1 Investigate the interdependence of plants and animals, including humans, within habitats and communities. [CP, SI]
  • HC4.3 Assess the effects of natural and human activities on habitats and communities, and propose actions to maintain or restore habitats. [CP, DM]

Earth and Space Science: Rocks, Minerals, and Erosion (RM)

  • RM4.2 Assess how human uses of rocks and minerals impact self, society, and the environment. [DM]
  • RM4.3 Analyze how weathering, erosion, and fossils provide evidence to support human understanding of the formation of landforms on Earth. [CP, SI, TPS]

Cross-Cultural Science & Technology Units (CCSTU) Project: http://www.usask.ca/education/ccstu/welcome.html

CLASSROOM RESOURCES

Storm at Batoche by Maxine Trottier 0-7737-3248-9

The Flower Beadwork People by Sherry Farrell Racette 978-0-920915-97-4

The Man Who Ran Faster than Everyone: Tom Lonboat Story by J Batten 978-0-88776-507-0

Native Men of Courage by Vincent Schilling 0977918335

Louis Riel by Rosemary Neering 1-55041-465-8

Stories of the Road Allowance People by Maria Campbell 9780920915998

The Scout Tommy Prince by David Alex Robertson/Scott Henderson 9781553794783

Kohkum’s Babushka by Marion Mutala 978-1-926795-78-2

Environmentalists From Our First Nations by Vincent Schilling 978-1-897187-98-2

Great Musicians From Our First Nations by Vincent Schilling 978-1-897187-76-0

Road Allowance Kitten by Wilfred Burton 978-1-926795-72-0

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Grade 4 Resources Grade 4